Reasons to Visit the World’s Most Famous Park, Central Park in New York

Reasons to Visit the World’s Most Famous Park, Central Park in New York

Central Park is packed with amazing features and it's truly no wonder why it's one of the most famous and most renowned parks in the world. Central Park comprises 843 acres of rolling meadows, boulder-studded outcroppings, elm-lined walkways, manicured European-style gardens, a lake and reservoir—not to mention an outdoor theater, a memorial to John Lennon, an idyllic waterside eatery and a famous statue of Alice in Wonderland. Download the Central Park Travel Guide and Offline Map to plan your next picnic at this wondrous green space.

1. Central Park Zoo

This compact zoo within Central Park is just small enough for a short, hour or two visit, but just large enough that everyone will seriously enjoy the exhibits. The children’s zoo, included with your admission, is hands-on and oh-so-fun, while the red panda exhibit will draw out every adorable “ahhh” from your vocabulary. this small zoo is home to penguins, snow leopards and lemurs. Feeding times in the sea lion and penguin tanks make for a rowdy spectacle.

2. Take a Stroll

It may seem obvious, but one of the best things to do while visiting Central Park is to just stroll through the beautiful grounds. With over 58 miles of trails, plenty of open spaces, stunning vegetation, animal encounters, rocks to climb, and sights to see, taking a walk through Central Park is the epitome of a New Yorker’s park experience. Be sure to wear comfy shoes, dress in layers, and plan on tackling one section of the park at a time.

3. Loeb Boathouse

Enjoy the park from the waterfront with rowboats (or gondolas) on the lake at the Loeb Boathouse, open spring through fall. This perfect warm-weather activity is a photo-op jackpot, so be sure to dress the kiddos in cute clothes. Loeb Boathouse also has a restaurant for one of the most idyllic settings for a meal in Central Park. Don't forget to try out their crab cakes--we hear they're exceptional!

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Orlando, More Than Just Its Theme Parks

Orlando, More Than Just Its Theme Parks

Who say can’t have a great time in Orlando without visiting a theme park? More often than not visitors overlook exploring downtown city Orlando. Aside from the world famous Disney and Universal theme parks, the Orlando area is home to a number of beautiful parks, interesting museums, great local restaurants and shops, a handful of waterfront attractions, entertaining shows, and much more. Download the Orlando Travel Guide and Offline Map now!

1.     Tibet-Butler Nature Preserve

Orlando’s small 440 acre nature preserve allows visitors to take a glimpse into the natural scenery of Florida. Take this opportunity to escape the crowds and intense heat of the afternoon sun for a relaxing and shady walk through this quiet preserve. Peaceful views of Lake Tibet-Butler along with beautiful flat-woods and wetlands provide the perfect setting for a scenic stroll.

2.     Silver Springs State Park

Silver Springs State Park in Ocala is famous for its’ glass bottom boat rides, one of Florida’s oldest tourist attractions. Here you will have an opportunity to take an exciting narrated ride across the largest artesian springs formation in the world. The transparent bottom of the boat allows you to see all different types of fish and plant life. Be sure to keep an eye out for the occasional gator sighting on the banks.

3.     Silver Moon Drive In

In Lakeland, just an hour drive from Orlando, you will find one of the last remaining drive-in theaters in the area. This drive-in is one of the cleanest and most affordable around. Double features are only 5 bucks a person, and on occasional weekends you may even be able to see 3 features for one low price. Treat yourself to some old-fashioned fun; what a nice classic activity to enjoy year-round!

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Beat the Caribbean Blues in the Tropical Oasis that is Key West

Beat the Caribbean Blues in the Tropical Oasis that is Key West

This 7-square-mile island feels like a beautiful tropical oasis. It’s allure stems not just from beautiful beaches and palm trees, but from the classical Caribbean homes and its eccentric vibes. It’s easy to find your groove in Key West—no matter where your interests lie. As in other parts of the Keys, nature plays a starring role here, with some breathtaking sunsets—cause for nightly celebration down on Mallory Square. Download the Key West Travel Guide and Offline Map and prepare for your trip down Highway One!

1.     Mallory Square

The fun begins in the hours leading to dusk where you’ll witness every single oddity and eccentric character on the island. Have a beer. And a conch fritter, and take a front-row seat to the music-filled mayhem. Once sunset arrives, all eyes turn to the water; and the showing comes crashing to an end shortly after the streaks of post-sunset gold, amber and lilac light up the evening sky.

2.     Fort Zachary Taylor State Park

“America’s Southernmost State Park” is home to an impressive fort, built in the mid-1800s that played roles in the American Civil War and in the Spanish-American War. The beach here is the best one Key West has to offer – it has white sand to lounge on (but is rocky in parts), water deep enough to swim in and tropical fish under the waves.

3.     Hemingway House

Key West’s biggest darling, Ernest Hemingway, lived in this gorgeous Spanish Colonial house from 1931 to 1940. Papa moved here in his early 1930s with wife No 2, a Vogue fashion editor and (former) friend of wife No 1 (he left the house when he ran off with wife No 3). The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber and The Green Hills of Africa were produced here, as well as many six-toed cats, whose descendants basically run the grounds.

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Things You Must Not Miss at the American Museum of Natural History

Things You Must Not Miss at the American Museum of Natural History

History buffs look no further, if there’s a one stop site for everything about history then the American Museum of Natural History is it. A wonderland of more than 30 million artifacts including tons of dinosaur skeletons, a cutting edge planetarium—the Rose Center for Earth & Space. And if you plan on visiting between October to May, the museum house a Butterfly Conservatory. Download the American Museum of Natural History visitor guide and learn more about this must visit in the USA.

1.     Lucy

In the Hall of Human Origins you will meet Lucy. She is one of the most complete skeletons of early hominids ever found. The remains were found in 1974 in Ethiopia. She’s known to be over three million years old, but her age and completeness aren’t the only reasons why she’s so important. Her knees show us that she walked upright.

2.     The Great Blue Whale

No list of things you can’t miss at the American Museum of Natural History would be complete without the Great Blue Whale. Located in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, it is 94 feet long and weighs 21,000 pounds. It’s a great reminder of the majesty and beauty of the blue whales, which unfortunately have been hunted to near extinction in the wild.

3.     Dinosaur Skeletons

The dinosaur skeletons at the AMNH are pretty amazing to say the least. There are two different halls in the David H. Koch Dinosaur Wing: the Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs and the hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs. The saurischians are characterized by their grasping hands, in which the thumb is offset from the other fingers: think of T-rex. Ornithischians on the other hand, are known for having enormous stomachs to digest massive amounts of vegetation they ate.

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Abu Dhabi, Conquering the World One World Record at a Time

Abu Dhabi, Conquering the World One World Record at a Time

Abu Dhabi isn’t shy in breaking world records: the world’s largest hand-loomed carpet, the fastest rollercoaster, the highest high tea, the tower with the greatest lean, the largest cluster of cultural buildings in the 21st century—is there nothing the UAE capital can’t beat? Explore this exciting city where everything seems to set on hustle and bustle mode with the Abu Dhabi Travel Guide and Offline Map

1.     Emirates Palace

Dubai might have Burj Khalifa soaring up vertically, but Abu Dhabi has the Emirates Palace, which sprawls horizontally. It is regarded as the BIG hotel in the Gulf and consists of audacious domed gatehouse and flying ramps to the foyer, 114 domes, and a 1.3 kilometer private beach. To make it more glamorous it has 1,002 crystal chandeliers and 392 luxury rooms and suites. The great thing is you don’t have to check-in to check it out.

2.     Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque

The Grand Mosque is impressive to Abu Dhabi. Rising from its well manicured gardens are more than 80 marble domes on a roofline held aloft by 1,000 pillars. Delicate floral designs inlaid with semi-precious stones, such as red agate, amethyst, and jasper decorate a variety of marbles. It is a masterpiece of modern Islamic Architecture and design. Built by UAE’s first President, Sheikh Zayed, it can hold up to 50,000 worship goers and is one of the very few mosques to welcome non-muslims in the region.

3.     Louvre Abu Dhabi

The highly anticipated Louvre Abu Dhabi finally arrived in late 2017. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Jean Nouvel, this striking museum definitely astounds. The 23-gallery project featuring a contrasting medina-inspired sequence of white buildings flanking a centerpiece. The elaborate, 180-meter-wide filigree dome pays homage to desert-palm shading with its geometric openings represent interlaced palm leaves used in traditional roofing.

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Top Three Destinations in the Marvelous City of Rio de Janeiro

Top Three Destinations in the Marvelous City of Rio de Janeiro

Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa where the beaches are golden, the mountains lush, and the nightlife is filled with samba. This city certainly does not disappoint, but don’t take our word for it, go see it for yourself. Lushly forested mountains fringe the city, shimmering beaches trace the shoreline and a string of tiny islands lie scattered along the seafront. So download the Rio de Janeiro Travel Guide and Offline Map and start your adventure now!

1.     Ipanema Beach

Ipanema Beach is so famous that a song was named after it. Here you’ll enjoy a clearer and cleaner beach compared to that of Copacabana. The word ipanema is an indigenous word for “bad, dangerous waters”, which is not far off given the strong undertow and often oversized waves that crash onto the shore. The long stretch of sun-drenched sand is demarcated by posts, which mark off subcultures as diverse as the city itself.

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2.     Parque Nacional da Tijuca

The 39-square-kilometer tropical jungle preserve is extremely rich with what mother nature has to offer. It filled with beautiful tress, waterfalls, mountainous terrain, and high peaks. It’s hard to imagine what this place once was as Tijuca is all that’s left of the Atlantic rainforest that once surrounded Rio de Janeiro. Serious hikers are very fond of Tijuca as climbing the 1,012 meter summit of Pico da Tijuca offers you a majestic view.

3.     Cristo Redentor

Of course, we can never leave out the famous Christ the Redeemer. Standing atop Corcovado, the massive statue of Cristo Redentor gazes out over Rio. The mountain itself rises straight up from the city to 710 meters and at night the brightly lit 38-meter high open armed statue is visible from nearly every part of the city.

Rio de Janeiro Travel Guide for iPhone, iPad and AppleWatch

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Reason Why Ko Samui is Food for the Soul

Reason Why Ko Samui is Food for the Soul

If you’re looking for the perfect relax and unwind after stressful months of work then Ko Samui is the perfect getaway you’ve been dreaming of. Wether you’e sun-seeking, dozing in a hammock, feasting on world-class cuisine, partying by the beach or discovering wellness in an exclusive spa, Ko Samui has it covered. Discover this island paradise with the Ko Samui Travel Guide and Offline Map

.1.     Pristine Beaches

It’s hard to resist the deep azure of the sky and the gentle lapping of warm waves on the satin sands of Ko Samui. The island’s beaches are as diverse as they get. Head to Coco Tam’s in Fisherman’s village for some cocktails and serious chillaxing, Chaweng Beach for some sunrise and people-watching, and Mae Nam Beach for some napping before witnessing a magnificent sunset in the west coast. If this reason alone doesn’t tempt you too book that ticket, we don’t know what will.

2.     Mouthwatering Cuisine

Dining in Ko Samui is remarkable in itself, but pair it with the island’s seductive sands then that’s takes it to top indulgence right there. From the simplest of Thai dishes to scorching regional curries, and plates hopping with flavor on seaside tables, you’ll definitely be spoiled for choice. Whatever suits your fancy, don’t ever overlook the flimsy wooden shack eateries. There you’ll find the best meals true-blue locals will not stop gushing about.

3.     Pamper Yourself

If you thought the beach and food was the ultimate pampering then you thought wrong. The island is filled to brim with places that will most definitely spoil your mind, body, and soul. Cleansing fasts, yoga, tai-chi, herbal steam treatments, and chakra-balancing—whatever you seek for full-on pampering, you’ll find it here. And while you’re at it ease away those aches and pains the island’s numerous spas can ease them to a next level of serenity.

Ko Samui Travel Guide for iPhone, iPad & AppleWatch

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Expect the Unexpected in Bilbao, Spain

Expect the Unexpected in Bilbao, Spain

Alluring architecture, an unexpected dining culture, and stunning landscapes that surround the city center; Bilbao is one of the marvelous hidden gems of the Basque Country. What once was an industrial city has transformed into a city of art after the unveiling of Frank Gehry’s shimmering titanium-clad Guggenheim museum. Download the Bilbao Travel Guide and Offline Map to get to know this unexpected city of beauty.

1.     Museo Guggenheim Bilbao

It’s hard to imagine a more mesmerizing sight than the shimmering titanium Museo Guggenheim Bilbao. It is definitely one of modern architecture’s most iconic buildings. Frank Gehry’s work helped lift Bilbao out of its post-industrial depression and catapulted it into the 21st century forefront. It sparked the city’s inspired regeneration, stimulated further development, and placed Bilbao in the international art and tourism spotlight.

2.     Bilbao Old Quarter

Bilbao’s atmospheric old quarter, Casco Viejo, may be compact but it is brimming with charming streets, boisterous bars, plenty of quirky and indie shops that will keep you busy for hours. The original seven streets date back to the 1400’s, so expect a lot of photogenic, colorful houses that line the main streets. The 14th-century gothic Catedral de Santiago has a splendid Renaissance portico and pretty little cloister you should not miss visiting.

3.     Basilica de Begoña

Towering over Casco Viejo from atop a nearby hill is this 16th-century basilica. It’s mainly Gothic in look, although there are still touches of Renaissance such as the arched main entrance, crept in during its century-long construction. The austere vaulted interior gleams by a gold altarpiece which contains a statue of the Virgin Begoña, the patron saint of Biscay.

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The Hills are Alive with the Sound of Music in Salzburg

The Hills are Alive with the Sound of Music in Salzburg

Some come here for the legendary Mozart. Some come for a more recent musical legacy, The Sound of Music. Either way, one thing is for sure, people stay for its spellbinding beauty. This city in north-central Austria is not only known for its musical legacies, but also for being the epitome of Baroque architecture, which is very much evident in the streets of old town. Nestles bedside the fast-flowing Salzach River, this wondrous city gives you spectacular views of beautiful spires and domes, a formidable clifftop fortress from a distance, and the endearing mountains from afar. So what are you waiting for? The music is calling! Download the Salzburg Travel Guide and Offline Map now.

1.      Festung Hohensalzburg

The city’s most visible icon is this mighty, 900-year old-old cliff-top fortress. The fortress is considered one of the biggest and best preserved in all of Europe. Built in 1077 as a humble bailey at present is now a formidable fortress thanks to Leonard von Keutschach, prince-archbishop of Salzburg from the late 1400’s to the late 1500’s. One of the highlights of anyone’s visit is the Golden Hall where lavish banquets used to take place under a gold-studded ceiling imitating a starry night.

2.      Schloss Mirabell

Built in 1606 by prince-archbishop Wolf Dietrich to impress his mistress, this splendid palace with a lavish interior, replete with stucco, marble, and frescoes. Its famed Marble Hall provides a sublime backdrop for evening concerts. Its gardens are a thing to behold as well. Here you’ll find the Pegasus statue, the steps and the gnomes of the Dwarf Garden where the von Trapp children practiced their “Do-Re-Mi”.

3.      Erzabtei St Peter

A Frankish missionary named Rupert founded this abbey and monastery in around 700, making it the oldest in the German-speaking world. Though the vaulted Romanesque portal remains, today’s church is very much baroque with rococo stucco, statues, and striking altar paintings. Its cemetery is also home to the catacombs—cave-like chapels and crypts hewn out of the Monchsberg cliff face. The graves itself are also intricate works of art made from stone and filigree wrought-iron crosses.

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From Sleepy to Metropolitan, Booming Portland

From Sleepy to Metropolitan, Booming Portland

What once seemed like a sleepy town, Oregon's largest city is now booming with rich advancements any metropolis would envy. The grubby dive bars have been replaced by coffee roasteries and craft breweries on just about every block. And the food carts--more and better than ever. If it sounds like Portland has become a concrete jungle, fret now. There is an abundance of natural beauty – perfect parks with leafy trees and a view of Mount Hood on the horizon. Download the Portland Travel Guide and Offline Map and go see for yourself!

1.  Pittock Mansion

This grand and beautiful 1914 mansion was built by pioneer-entrepreneur Henry Pittock, who revitalized the Oregonian newspaper; his wife, Georgiana, also a pioneer, started the earliest of Portland's annual Rose Festivals. Guided tours are available, but it's also worth visiting the grounds simply to have a picnic while taking in the spectacular views. If you're up for a wander, the mansion lies along the Wildwood Trail in Forest Park, with dozens of miles of connecting trails branching off it.

2. Forest Park

Abutting the more manicured Washington Park to the south is the far wilder 5100-acre Forest Park, a temperate rainforest that harbors plants and animals and hosts an avid hiking fraternity. The Portland Audubon Society maintains a bookstore, a wildlife-rehabilitation center and 4.5 miles of trails within its Forest Park sanctuary. It's worth visiting the grounds just to check out the spectacular views – bring a picnic.

3. Pioneer Courthouse Square

One of Portland's grandest Victorian hotels once stood here, but it fell into disrepair and was torn down in 1951. Later the city decided to build Pioneer Courthouse Sq, and grassroots support resulted in a program that encouraged citizens to buy and personalize the bricks that eventually built the square. Names include Sherlock Holmes, William Shakespeare, and Elvis Presley. Across 6th Ave is the Pioneer Courthouse. Built in 1875, this was the legal center of 19th-century Portland.

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Discovering the Myth and Magic that Cyprus Has to Offer

Discovering the Myth and Magic that Cyprus Has to Offer

While everyone scurries away to Italy, Greece or Spain during the warm European Summer everyone seems to overlook the beauty that Cyprus has to offer. Located in the eastern Mediterranean, it boasts romantic harbors, splendid ancient ruins and ruggedly stunning beaches that are for sure the stuff of myth and magic. Download the Cyprus Travel Guide and Offline Map now and discover this underrated summer destination.

1.  Pafos Archaeological Site

Nea Pafos is, ironically, the name given to the sprawling Pafos Archaeological Site, to the west of Kato Pafos. Nea Pafos was the ancient city of Pafos, founded in the late 4th century BC and originally encircled by massive walls. Despite being ceded to the Romans in 58 BC, it remained the center of all political and administrative life in Cyprus. It is most famed today for its mesmerizing collection of intricate and colorful mosaics based on ancient Greek myths.

2. Old Town

Wrapping around the Old Harbour, the diminutive Old Town is an atmospheric area for a wander. Its winding alleyways hold a jumble of abandoned stone buildings slowly slipping into disrepair, mixed with newer concrete additions. Modest remnants of Kyrenia's long history are speckled throughout the lanes. Two of the major monuments are the Ottoman-era Ağa Cafer Pașa Mosque and the dilapidated remains of 16th-century Chysopolitissa Church. There are also ancient Greco-Roman tombs on the road leading to Archangelos Michael Church.

3. Ayia Napa

Ayia Napa is a Mediterranean resort town on the southeast coast of Cyprus, known for its beaches. The town's main landmark is the storied, Venetian-era Ayia Napa Monastery, which stands in the central square of Plateia Seferi, surrounded by bars and clubs. Freshly caught seafood is served at Ayia Napa Harbour’s busy tavernas while adjoining Pantachou Beach offers a stretch of golden sand.

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Three Compelling Sites You Shouldn't Miss in Kakadu National Park

Three Compelling Sites You Shouldn't Miss in Kakadu National Park

There's nothing like exploring the Australian outback, but we say there's truly nothing like exploring Kakadu National Park. Kakadu is a whole lot more than a national park. In just a few days you can cruise on billabongs bursting with wildlife, examine 25,000-year-old rock paintings with the help of an Indigenous guide, swim in pools at the foot of tumbling waterfalls and hike through ancient sandstone escarpment country. Download the Kakadu National Park Travel Guide and Offline Map and start exploring.

1. Ubirr

Ubirr is 39km north of the Arnhem Hwy via a sealed road. It'll take a lot more than the busloads of visitors to disturb Ubirr's inherent majesty and grace. Layers of rock-art paintings, in various styles and from various centuries, command a mesmerizing stillness. Part of the main gallery depicts images of kangaroos, tortoises, and fish. Predating these are the paintings of mimi spirits: cheeky, dynamic figures who, it's believed, were the first of the Creation Ancestors to paint on rock.

2. Cahill's Crossing

It may be small, but there can be few more dramatic frontiers in Australia. This shallow causeway, which is impassable when the tide's in, crosses the East Alligator River from Kakadu National Park on the west bank to Arnhem Land to the east. And watching you as you cross is the river's healthy and rather prolific population of saltwater crocs. If you're not going across, wander down to the slightly elevated lookout on the west bank, but go no further as crocs lie in wait right by the riverbank.

3. Injalak Arts & Crafts Centre

At this center, artists and craftspeople display traditional paintings on bark and paper, plus didgeridoos, pandanus weavings and baskets, and screen-printed fabrics; the shop is excellent and half of the sale price goes directly to the artists. Take the time to wander around and watch the artists at work. The women usually make baskets out in the shade of the trees on the center's west side, while the men paint on the verandah to the east. Some of the works come from remote outstations throughout Arnhem Land.

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Why You Should Never Miss the Guggenheim Museum When Visiting the Big Apple

Why You Should Never Miss the Guggenheim Museum When Visiting the Big Apple

The Guggenheim Museum in New York houses works by art heavyweights such as Kandinsky, Picasso and Jackson Pollock. But the real draw is the temporary exhibitions by some of the great visionary artists of today. Not to mention the stunning conical white spiral in which these great artworks are displayed is reason enough to visit. Download the Guggenheim Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map to help your art outing.

1.  Woman Ironing by Pablo Picasso

During Picasso's Blue Period, he famously depicted peasants, laborers, beggars and other downtrodden folks in shades of blue. Though this long-limbed, hunched woman is shown in grays and blacks, she represents that same period of gloom. It's a kind of metaphor for the poor in general, the forever oppressed.

2. "Untitled” by Mark Rothko

This classic Mark Rothko piece was painted between 1952 and 1953 and features his iconic large-scale blocks of bright colors. Rothko, an American artist, is one of the central figures of the New York School, who creates his abstract pieces to illicit “basic human emotions — tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on,” from the audience, according to Rothko himself.

3. “The Renowned Orders Of The Night” by Anselm Kiefer

Anselm Kiefer was born in Germany just before the end of World War II, and many of his artworks explore the themes surrounding war, as well as the rise of fascism. This piece, entitled “The Renowned Orders Of The Night,” features the artist himself lying on a bed of dry, cracked earth, as if he were a corpse, under a vast starry sky. In his later artworks, Kiefer became obsessed with the night sky, and he created a few different artworks exploring its beauty.

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Top Three Reason Why the Greek Islands is the Ultimate Summer Destination

Top Three Reason Why the Greek Islands is the Ultimate Summer Destination

It's hard to imagine a more picturesque destination for your European Summer adventures than the Greek Islands. Laced with wondrous ocean landscapes, delectable food, unique architecture, and myths any history buff would want to discover. You can never contest how it has become the continent's most popular destination. Enjoy the island breeze and sip wine in one of the many local restaurants while enjoying one of the most stunning sunsets in the world. So what are you waiting for? Download the Greek Islands Travel Guide and Offline Map now and let the adventure begin!

1. Santorini

Although there are plenty of islands to choose from, Santorini is considered to be the most spectacular. Its cliff-side homes with their iconic white and blue color combination are very symbolic of Greece. Catch the sunset in Oia, visit the many historical sites, and go for a winery tour--Santorini offers so much more than just great sceneries. It may be touristy but the prices are surprising low which makes it possible for you to soak up the sun on this beautiful island even longer.

2. Archaeological Museum of Heraklion

People flock to Crete for many reasons, but one thing is never missed while spending time here--visiting Greece's second largest and most important museum. The two-story revamped 1930’s Bauhaus building makes a gleaming backdrop for artifacts spanning 5,500 years from Neolithic to Roman times, including a Minoan collection of unparalleled richness. The rooms are color-coded and displays are arranged both chronologically and thematically and presented with descriptions in English. A visit here will greatly enhance your understanding of Crete’s rich history. Don’t skip it.

3. Temple of Olympian Zeus

While you are walking about Athens, this is an incredible archaeological site to stop at. This temple is massive and took over 700 years to construct (dating back to the sixth century). A can't-miss on two counts: it's a marvelous temple, the largest in Greece, and it's smack in the center of Athens. The temple is impressive for the sheer size of its 104 Corinthian columns, of which 15 remain – the fallen column was blown down in a gale in 1852.

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What to See in London's Renowned Tate Modern

What to See in London's Renowned Tate Modern

This modern and contemporary art gallery is known to be one of London's most amazing attractions. What used to be Bankside Power Station on the South of the Millenium Bridge was revamped into what is now known as Tate Modern. The mesmerizing synthesis of modern art and industrial brick design brings about an extraordinarily successful in bringing challenging work to the masses. Download the Tate Modern Travel Guide and Offline Map now and start exploring.

1. Marilyn Diptych

Andy Warhol is a household name in the world of art, and this piece on Marilyn Monroe is eerily more relevant in today’s picture and pop-obsessed culture than ever before. Made in the months following the star’s death, Warhol combines ideas of finitude and the cult of celebrity by repeating the same image of the starlet with a gradual fade out that hints at mortality as it is contrasted with the acid bright images on the left.

2. Nude Woman With Necklace

One of Picasso’s best-known works, this colorful portrait bursts with unbridled energy and life. It depicts Picasso’s second wife, Jacqueline Roque, and her enigmatic facial expression is full of enough mystery to rival the Mona Lisa – she is at once vulnerable and defiant. The complexity of her portrait and the chaotic figuring of the body as simultaneous landscape and natural energies encapsulate the turbulent nature of their marriage.

3. Spatial Concept ‘Waiting’

Modern art famously challenges traditional artwork, forcing the viewer to scratch the surface and consider the true nature of artistic representation. Perhaps no work does so more simply and effectively than Spatial Concept ‘Waiting’, which presents the viewer with a boldly slashed canvas and asks them to reflect on the nature of the image and the materiality of the painting.

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Rijksmuseum, Home to the Netherlands’ Art Heroes

Rijksmuseum, Home to the Netherlands’ Art Heroes

See one of the world's finest art museums, packed with more than 7,000 masterpieces over 1.5 kilometers of galleries. The museum also showcases art by local masters such as Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Van Gogh. But there's more to do at the Rijksmuseum than just art, stroll around their sculpture studded, lush gardens or dine in their Michelin star in-house Rijks restaurant. Whatever you do, don't forget to do it with the Rijksmuseum Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1. The Night Watch

Known to be Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn's most famous and largest canvas it comes to know surprise that this piece attracts thousands of visitors. Rembrandt was the first to paint lively figures in a group portrait. Made for the Arquebusiers guild hall survived its cutting to fit into the Town Hall in 1715. And during World War II, it was rolled into a cylinder form and moved out of Amsterdam.  In the last 40 years there have been two attacks of vandalism on the painting

2. Vincent Van Gogh's Self-portrait

The master's self-portrait represents many facets of his tragic story. In 1888, Van Gogh moved to France and experienced great creativity, but alongside is came tensions and dementia and at one point ended up cutting his own ear. After the incident, he checked himself into a mental institution. His creativity, although coupled with madness, never wavered until he moved to Auvers-sur-Oise in 1890, where he eventually committed suicide.

3. Banquet at the Crossbowmen’s Guild

Bartholomeus van der Helst's most famous work was done in 1648, depicting the signing of the Treaty of Münster, which marked an end to the war with Spain. The banquet takes place at the Amsterdam crossbowmen’s guild. It is a symbolic meal of peace, where Amsterdam's reconciliation politics are highlighted. But this isn't just why it's so famous. If you look closely you will see fine details in the painting that you wouldn't at just a glance.

Rijksmuseum Guide for iPhone, iPad & AppleWatch

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Why You Should Visit the Largest Ancient Castle in the World in Prague

Why You Should Visit the Largest Ancient Castle in the World in Prague

The castle has always been the seat of Czech monarchs as well as the official residence of the head of state. Looming above the Vltava's left bank, its serried ranks of spires, towers, and palaces dominate the city center like a fairy-tale fortress. Its history begins in the 9th century when Prince Bořivoj founded a fortified settlement here. It grew haphazardly as rulers made their own additions. Download the Prague Castle Travel Guide and Offline Map and make your way there now.

1. The Crown Jewels

Stowed away in a chamber of St. Vitus Cathedral, the Bohemian Crown Jewels include the St. Wenceslas crown, royal scepter, and coronation cloak. And the Republic isn't taking any chances with their safekeeping. Both the chamber door and iron safe inside have seven locks, the keys to which are held by seven people, including the President, Prime Minister, and Prague Archbishop. The President typically puts them on display every five years. When he does, all seven key holders must head over to the Castle for the unlocking process.

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2. Its History

A crucial Holocaust organizer, Reinhard Heydrich held court at Prague Castle starting in 1941. Terrified Czechs nicknamed him The Butcher of Prague. But a group of exiled Czech government officials decided to take action. Two Czech soldiers parachuted back into the country and headed for Prague, where they hopped on bicycles and rode toward the Castle. When they spotted The Butcher in his Mercedez convertible, they made their move, shooting and tossing grenades his way.

3. The Largest Castle in the World

The Prague Castle complex is enormous, with an area totaling of 753,474 square feet. That makes it the largest ancient castle in the world, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. The complex extends down to the Lesser Quarter or Mala Strana, where several chateaux and palaces are found. Wallenstein Palace, for one, is home to the Czech Senate and includes 26 houses and six gardens.

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What to See in France's Very Own Orsay Museum

What to See in France's Very Own Orsay Museum

The glorious Gare d’Orsay railway station now stands proud as the country's home for its national collection of the impressionist, postimpressionist and art-nouveau movements spanning from 1848 to 1914. The museum itself is an art-nouveau showpiece. The must-see on every visitor's list is Orsay Museum's painting collections, centered on the world's largest collection of impressionist and post-impressionist art. Download the Orsay Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map and take a trip to France now.

1. Polar Bear

Considered as the museum's most iconic work, Polar Bear is one of the standouts by Francois Pompon. The master himself was once an assistant to Camille Claudel and Auguste Rodin who later on struck out on his own and create his animal-inspired works. Eschewing realism, he sought to communicate the barest minimum of the animal and upon closer inspection, the animal begins to fade away – leaving only marble.

2. Olympia

Edouard Manet was fondly known as the bad boy of the art world in his days. His most controversial work, Olympia, depicts a nude prostitute who looks calmly at the viewer and in complete indifference of her nakedness. This was a huge clash against the classical tropes of blushing virgins and highborn women in art, which ignited a huge conversation about the representation of women in art.

3. Poppy Field

This dreamy, peaceful landscape painted by Claude Monet is one of the artist’s most famous works. Painted after he had moved from England to laidback Argenteuil, the impressionist artist produced vibrant colors to channel the spirit of a beautiful sunny day in nature. The striking reds of wild poppies against a muted green background serve to make the piece all the more vivid, heightened only by the black and white figures slipping through the field.

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3 Compelling Reasons to Visit the National Gallery of Art in Washington

3 Compelling Reasons to Visit the National Gallery of Art in Washington

There are various reasons to visit the National Gallery of Art in Washington, its collection of paintings, prints, photos, sculpture, and decorative arts traces the development of Western Art from the Middle Ages up to the present. This includes the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile created by Alexander Calder. Download the National Gallery of Art in Washington Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1. Ginevra de’ Benci

The portrait of Ginevra de’ Benci is the only Leonardo da Vinci painting on public display not just in the District, but in all the Americas. The late 15th-century oil is more austere than da Vinci’s best-known portrait, made about 25 years later. There’s no hint of a smile on the face of this young woman, probably 16 and newly engaged when she posed.

2. Electronic Superhighway

Approach the tiny screen that represents the District in “Electronic Superhighway,” and you’ll see yourself live on closed-circuit TV. That’s one of many playful touches in Nam June Paik’s 40-foot-wide assemblage, which represents the United States in images fed from 50 DVD players to 335 television sets, plus that D.C. one. The screens show sweeping landscapes, iconic products and clips from Hollywood movies, all hurtling by as if glimpsed from a car racing at the speed limit.

3. Adams Memorial

There are works by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in the Smithsonian and the National Gallery of Art (the plaster version of his famous memorial to Robert Gould Shaw), but one of the most evocative of his statues isn’t in a museum, but rather in Rock Creek Cemetery. Commissioned by the great American writer Henry Adams, the Adams Memorial is a haunting, shrouded figure, set alone in a peaceful copse, a powerful memorial to Adams’s wife, who died by her own hand in 1885.

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Malta, Paradise Found at the Center of the Mediterranean

Malta, Paradise Found at the Center of the Mediterranean

This tiny archipelago may be small but it packs a punch when it comes to glorious landscapes. It boasts prehistoric temples, fossil-studded cliffs, hidden coves, and thrilling scuba diving. Its cuisine also should not be overlooked; traditional Maltese food mixes Sicilian and Middle Eastern flavors while making use of local ingredients such as rabbit and honey. If that's not enough to make you book that ticket Malta, we don't know what will. While you're at it download the Malta Travel Guide and Offline and start exploring.

1. Valletta

The capital of Malta and a UNESCO World Heritage Site is often dubbed as "one of the most concentrated historic areas in the world". It was built by the Knights of Saint John on a peninsula that's only 1 kilometer by 600 meters. It retains its 16th-century allure and elegance to this day.  New museums, restored golden-stone fortresses, and new hotels ushered Valletta's status as European Capital of Culture for 2018.

2. Blue Lagoon

The Blue Lagoon in Comino is one of the island's biggest draws. It is a sheltered cove between the western end of the island and Cominotto--an uninhabited islet. It's famed for its white-sand seabed and clear waters. The blue is so bright and intense that you would think a real-life Instagram filter was used. There are top-notch swimming and snorkeling here, plus you can swim over to Cominotto.

3. Hal Saflieni Hypogeum

The Hypogeum, from the Greek, meaning underground is a subterranean necropolis, discovered during building work in 1902. To visit is to step into a mysterious and silent world. Its halls, chambers, and passages, immaculately hewn out of the rock, cover some 500-square meters; it is thought to date from around 3600 to 3000 BC, and an estimated 7000 bodies may have been interred here.

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