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Kuala Lumpur: A City for the Culturally Inclined

Kuala Lumpur: A City for the Culturally Inclined

Malaysia’s capital is a great example of a cultural melting pot. Amidst its majestic mosques, modern skyscrapers,  Kuala Lumpur’s mix of cultures, Indian, Malay, Chinese, and Western, creates a unique blend of food, shopping, and nightlife. Download the Kuala Lumpur Travel Guide and Offline Map and start planning your trip to his invigorating city.

1.     Islamic Arts Museum

Stepping inside the Islamic Arts Museum is like inside a treasure trove. The building itself is every bit as impressive as the collection it houses. It showcases Islamic decorative arts from around the world. Here you’ll find scale models of the world’s best Islamic buildings, gorgeous textiles, carpets, jewelry, and calligraphy-inscribed pottery.

2.     Kampung Baru

It seems like time stood still in this neighborhood filled with rows of traditional Malay wooden houses, village life unfolds despite the surrounding skyscrapers. Kampung Baru’s low-slung charms are best showcased as you wander its streets. Along the way be sure to stop by and enjoy tasty home-cooked Malay food at the many roadside cafes and stalls.

3.     Petronas Towers

Resembling two twin rockets shooting from up the ground, the Petronas Towers is the perfect presentation for the rise of the city to the 21st-century metropolis that it is now. Purchase tickets for a 45-minute tour that take you in the Skybridge connection on the 41st floor and the observation deck on the 86th floor at 370 meters above ground.

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Culturally Emersion Through Thailand’s Temples

Culturally Emersion Through Thailand’s Temples

Thailand’s vibrancy manifests itself in every corner of the country. From the scenery and art to its culture and people, you will be left awestruck from the moment you step off the plane. The country of smiles is more than just bustling Bangkok and pristine beaches, it’s a place of culture that’s deeply rooted to religion. And what better way to get to know Thailand than exploring its numerous, beautifully crafted temples? Download the Thailand Travel Guide and Offline Map to get started on your journey!

1.     Wat Pho

Among Bangkok’s famous sights, Wat Pho has gained its due fame from its gigantic Reclining Buddha. This temples has made a name for itself by collecting a handful of superlatives: the city’s largest reclining Buddha, the largest collection of Buddha images in Thailand, and the country’s earliest center for public education.

2.     Wat Phra Kaew

Bangkok’s biggest tourist attraction and a pilgrimage destination for devout Buddhists and nationalists. This architecturally awe-inspiring temple is the spiritual core of Thai Buddhism and the monarchy, which houses the country’s most holy image, the Emerald Buddha. Attached to the temple complex is the Grand Palace, the former royal residence, once a sealed city of intricate ritual and social satisfaction.

3.     Wat Phumin

Located in Nan Province, bordering Laos, is Nan’s most famous Buddhist temple. It is adorned with exquisite murals that were done during the late 19th century by a Thai Lü artist named Thit Buaphan. The ornate altar in the centre of the bòht has four sides, with four Sukhothai-style sitting Buddhas facing in each direction.

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Fulfill Your Caribbean Dreams in Puerto Rico

Fulfill Your Caribbean Dreams in Puerto Rico

Haven’t got plans for a long weekend? Why not travel to Puerto Rico satisfies both the beach bums just looking for place to relax and chill and the adventure seekers looking to tackle big waves. We’re for sure its long stretches of sand will entice you to stay and leave you Caribbean blue once you leave. Download the Puerto Rico Travel Guide and Offline Map to jump start your next travels.

1.     Playa Flamenco

Sheltered inside a horseshoe-shaped bay, Playa Flamenco’s mile-long stretch of white beach is hailed as one of the finest beached in the Caribbean. The name comes from the flamingos that flock inside the bay during Winter. The iconic rusting tank is at the beach's western end, a legacy of when US troops practiced invasions here.

2.     Isla Culebrita

When you’re itching for some island hopping, we highly recommend hiring that water taxi and head for Isla Culebrita. This small island to the east of Playa Zoni is a part of the national wildlife refuge. With its six beaches, tide pools, reefs, and nesting areas for sea birds—there’s for sure plenty to do here. The north beaches, especially the long crescent of Playa Tortuga, are popular nesting grounds for green sea turtles.

3.     Bahia Mosquito

About two miles east of Esperanza is a designated wildlife preserve that has the highest concentration of phosphorescent dinoflagellates in the world. The magnificent bay of Bahia Mosquito is nothing short of psychedelic with hundreds of fish whipping up fluorescent-blue sparkles below the surface as your kayak passes by.

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Heaven on Earth: Visiting Mauritius

Heaven on Earth: Visiting Mauritius

Mark Twain once wrote, 'Mauritius was made first and then heaven, heaven being copied after Mauritius'. It’s hard to imagine a more compelling visage of heaven than Mauritius: sapphire-blue waters, powder-white sand, and a front row seat to one of the most beautiful views of the Indian Ocean. Download the Mauritius Travel Guide and Offline Map and experience heaven on Earth for yourself.

1.     Rodrigues

Barely touched by commercialization one would think they’ve traveled back in time on this tiny volcanic outcrop 600 kilometers away from the mainland. As the locals wold often tell you,”It is Mauritius of 25 years ago”. Here you’ll experience what true island time means and its time-warped vibe. It is beautiful forgotten world in some of the most remote corners of the globe.

2.     Eureka

There’s no better place to learn about Mauritius’ rich colonial history than in Eureka. The perfectly preserved Creole mansion was built in the 1830’s and stands today as a museum. Visiting Eureka is like stepping into a time machine and gives you incredible insight into the island’s vibrant plantation past.

3.     Vallée de Ferney

This 400-year-old forest is an important habitat for the Mauritius kestrel—one of the world’s most endangered raptors and visiting here is probably one of your best chance in ever seeing one. The guides take you along a 3-kilometer trail and at noon the staff feed the wild kestrels at the trailhead. As an important habitat for endemic species, Vallée de Ferney promises to be an important conservation and ecotourism area in the coming years.

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It’s the Prefect Time to Visit Riviera Maya and Here’s Why

It’s the Prefect Time to Visit Riviera Maya and Here’s Why

Visiting Mexico's Caribbean Coast, known as the Riviera Maya is a must for every adventurer at heart. It's great for road trips where you can explore more of numerous white-sand beaches, scenic ruins, and amazing cenotes. It might be a little too busy for some, but despite the development, you can still discover small fishing towns or set forth inland and experience the true-blue Mexican culture untouched by tourism. Download the Riviera Maya Travel Guide and Offline Map to help you plan your next trip.

1. Chichen Itza

The famous Mayan ruins are UNESCO world heritage and one of the New 7 Wonders of the World. Even if you are in your all-inclusive relaxing vacation, a day trip is totally worth it. Chichen Itza is a huge complex of Mayan ruins in a shape of pyramids built by Maya people approximately 1,200 years ago. Keep in mind that the area is big, it is not only one pyramid that you see on all the pictures, it is an ensemble of many greatly preserved ruins.

2. Grupo Nohoch Mul

Nohoch Mul (Big Mound) is also known as the Great Pyramid. It reaches a height of 42 meters, making it the second-tallest Maya structure on the Yucatán Peninsula. Climbing the old steps can be scary for some. Two diving gods are carved over the doorway of the temple at the top (built in the post-Classic period, AD 1100–1450), similar to sculptures at Tulum.

3. Grupo de las Pinturas

The temple at Grupo de las Pinturas (Paintings Group) bears traces of glyphs and frescoes above its door and remnants of richly colored plaster inside. You approach the temple from the southeast. Leave by the trail at the northwest (opposite the temple steps) to see two stelae. The first of these is 20m along, beneath a palapa. Here, a regal figure stands over two others, one of them kneeling with his hands bound behind him.

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Discovering Playa del Carmen, Mexico's Next Big Thing

Discovering Playa del Carmen, Mexico's Next Big Thing

Playa del Carmen's popularity is growing more and more each year. It now ranks as the third-largest city in Quintana Roo and competes with Tulum as one of the Riviera's rendiest cities. The town is ideally located: close to Cancún’s international airport, but far enough south to allow easy access to Cozumel, Tulum, Cobá and other worthy destinations. So If you're looking for your next tropical destination download the Playa del Carmen Travel Guide and Offline Map now!

1.  Cenote Diving

What’s a cenote you ask? It’s an underground cave filled with fresh water. The Yucatan has tons of them—sinkholes that open up into underground rivers with the clearest water you’ve ever seen. If you have your PADI license, you can go scuba diving in these caves with a guide. Because there’s daylight near the entrance a more technical cave diving license isn’t required. Not a diver? No problem. You can also go snorkeling at most cenotes.

2. Visit Mayan Ruins

The ancient Mayan ruins of Tulum are located South of Playa del Carmen in the town of Tulum. A must-visit if you’re in the area.

Tulum was once a small but important port city for the Mayans. Along with impressive structures on the edge of a cliff, it has a beach below where you can swim too. Because Tulum is so popular, it can be crowded unless you arrive early in the morning. Coba is another Mayan site near Playa del Carmen which sees less visitors. You can still climb the pyramid there too.

3. Swim With Sea Turtles

Who doesn’t want to swim with sea turtles? I’ve always wanted to, that’s for sure. I got my chance at Akumal beach, 30 minutes South of Playa del Carmen. The shallow blue-green water here is home to Green, Hawksbill and Loggerhead sea turtles that you can swim with.

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Epic Adventures in New Zealand’s Outback

Epic Adventures in New Zealand’s Outback

Scattered all over New Zealand are sublime forests, mountains, lakes, beaches and fiords that have made NZ one of the best hiking destinations on the planet. With just 4.8 million New Zealanders scattered across 268,021 sq km, prepare for mammoth national parks, a dynamic local culture, and world-class surfing and skiing. Whether you're looking for a chill and relaxing vacation or an action-packed one, New Zealand has got you covered. Download the New Zealand Travel Guide and Offline Map now!

1. Abel Tasman National Park

If there's one National Park you shouldn't miss out on that's Abel Tasman National Park. It's definitely every adventurers dream come true blanketing the northern end of a range of marble and limestone hills that extend from Kahurangi National Park. Various tracks in the park include an inland route, although the Coast Track is what everyone is here for--it's New Zealand's most popular Great Walk.

2. Rotorua

Welcome to "Sulphur City"--New Zealand's most dynamic geothermal area where steam casually wafts out of the drains and mud boils in public parks. The sulphur-rich air and all its springs might be one of its draws, but the city is also hailed for its dynamic Māori culture. The Māori revered this place, naming one of the most spectacular springs Wai-O-Tapu (Sacred Waters). Today 34% of the population is Māori, with cultural performances and traditional hāngi (steam-cooked banquets) as big an attraction as the landscape itself.

3. Milford Sound

Rising above the fiord's indigo water is Mitre Peak and has become the subject of millions of photographs for good reason. Scoured into the bare rock are pathways from tree avalanches, where entangled roots dragged whole forests down into darkly glittering water. Today, tapering to a cloud-piercing summit, the 1692m-high mountain appears. When rain comes (and that’s often), dozens of temporary waterfalls curtain the cliffs. Stirling and Lady Bowen Falls gush on in fine weather, with rainbows bouncing from their mists when sunlight strikes just right.

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Reasons Why Italy is the Capital of European Summer

Reasons Why Italy is the Capital of European Summer

Italy’s great food, beautiful countryside, fabulous wine, and long history make it an excellent country to visit. I fall in love with it every time I go. The vineyards in Tuscany, the history of Florence, the ancient streets in Rome, the laid back nature of Southern Italy, the gorgeous Cinque Terre, and the romantic canals in Venice all make the country irresistible. Italy leaves no one underwhelmed and, with so much to do and see, you better download the Italy Travel Guide and Offline Map to help you plan your trip.

1.  Tuscan Hills

Tuscany has a timeless familiarity with its iconic Florentine cathedral dome, gently rolling hills dipped in soft morning mist and sculptural cypress alleys. Get out, explore, hike and ding your bicycle bell, as this rousing landscape demands. Then there's the food. No land is more caught up with the fruits of its fertile earth than Tuscany, a gourmet destination whose residents spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about, discussing and consuming food and wine.

2. The Ruins of Pompeii

The ghostly ruins of ancient Pompeii make for one of the world's most engrossing archaeological experiences. Much of the site's value lies in the fact that the town wasn't simply blown away by Vesuvius in AD 79 but buried under a layer of lapilli (burning fragments of pumice stone). The result is a remarkably well-preserved slice of ancient life, where visitors can walk down Roman streets and snoop around millennia-old houses, temples, shops, cafes, amphitheatres, and even a brothel.

3. Venetian Grandeur

The Grand Canal, reflects the glories of Venetian architecture lining its banks. At the end of Venice’s signature waterway, the Palazzo Ducale and Basilica di San Marco add double exclamation points. But wait until you see what’s hiding in the narrow backstreets: neighbourhood churches lined with Veroneses and priceless marbles, Tiepolo’s glimpses of heaven on homeless-shelter ceilings, and a single Titian painting that mysteriously lights up an entire basilica.

Italy Guide for iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch

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Hokkaido, the northernmost of Japan's main islands

Hokkaido, the northernmost of Japan's main islands

Hokkaido may be famous for its exceptional food with the freshest produce, but asides from its delectable cuisine there's plenty to do year round. It is also known for its primeval forests, volcanoes, bubbling natural hot springs, fields of alpine wildflowers, and ski areas. Rugged yet tranquil, the island's stunning scenery will surely leave you wanting more. Download the Hokkaido Travel Guide and Offline Map to help you plan out your trip.

1. Shikisai-no-oka

From April to October, dozens of flowers blanket the hills of Shikisai-no-oka, so there are many months to feast your eyes on a rainbow of blossoms. In the winter, snow covers the grounds and you can cruise around on a snowmobile or go sledding down the slopes. No matter what season you decide to visit, they also have an alpaca ranch where you can help feed the fuzzy animals.

2. Sapporo

The island’s capital may be one of the most underrated cities in Japan. Home to the eponymous beer (a museum has been dedicated to it), expansive sculpture parks, and delectable regional cuisine such as soup curry and jingisukan (grilled mutton), there’s plenty to see and eat in Sapporo. And of course there are markets to visit. Nijo Market is the most accessible from downtown, but if you want to shop with the locals, head out to Jyogai Ichiba for a more authentic experience.

3. Otaru

Just a short 30-minute train ride from Sapporo, Otaru is particularly known for glassware and music boxes, but if you’re going to make a trip to this small harbor city, make sure to grab lunch at Wakadori Jidai Naruto Honten, where you’ll have some of the best fried chicken you’ve ever sunk your teeth into. Walk off your meal along the Otaru Canal before you turn onto Sakaimachi road to do a little shopping at the number of shops that line the street.

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Reasons Why the French Riviera is the Ultimate Summer Destination

Reasons Why the French Riviera is the Ultimate Summer Destination

The French Riviera, also known as the Côte d’Azur, is a dreamy French region that extends east along the coast from Menton and Monaco to Théoule sur Mer and up into the Southern Alps. The Riviera contains several cities (Nice and Cannes among them), 14 natural parks, Roman ruins, medieval villages and whale watching just off shore. So we're sure you'll have a grand time exploring the Riviera. Download the French Riviera Travel Guide and Offline Map now!

1. Vieux Nice

Getting lost among the dark, narrow, winding alleyways of Nice’s old town is a highlight. The layout has barely changed since the 1700s, and it’s now packed with delis, restaurants, boutiques and bars, but the centerpiece remains cours Saleya: a massive market square that’s permanently thronging in summer. The food market is perfect for fresh produce and foodie souvenirs, while the flower market is worth visiting just for the colors and fragrances.

2. Casino de Monte Carlo

Peeping inside Monte Carlo’s legendary marble-and-gold casino is a Monaco essential. The building, open to visitors every morning, is Europe's most lavish example of belle-epoque architecture. Prince Charles III came up with the idea of the casino and in 1866, three years after its inauguration, the name 'Monte Carlo' – Ligurian for 'Mount Charles' in honor of the prince – was coined.

3. Marseille

Marseille is a dynamic, edgy, bustling city that’s rich with more than 1500 years of history. And since its stint as the European Capital of Culture in 2013 and the addition of a brace of swanky new museums, the city has sparkled with a new sense of optimism and self-belief. The heart of the city is the vibrant Vieux Port (old port), mast-to-mast with yachts and pleasure boats. 

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Orlando, More Than Just Its Theme Parks

Orlando, More Than Just Its Theme Parks

Who say can’t have a great time in Orlando without visiting a theme park? More often than not visitors overlook exploring downtown city Orlando. Aside from the world famous Disney and Universal theme parks, the Orlando area is home to a number of beautiful parks, interesting museums, great local restaurants and shops, a handful of waterfront attractions, entertaining shows, and much more. Download the Orlando Travel Guide and Offline Map now!

1.     Tibet-Butler Nature Preserve

Orlando’s small 440 acre nature preserve allows visitors to take a glimpse into the natural scenery of Florida. Take this opportunity to escape the crowds and intense heat of the afternoon sun for a relaxing and shady walk through this quiet preserve. Peaceful views of Lake Tibet-Butler along with beautiful flat-woods and wetlands provide the perfect setting for a scenic stroll.

2.     Silver Springs State Park

Silver Springs State Park in Ocala is famous for its’ glass bottom boat rides, one of Florida’s oldest tourist attractions. Here you will have an opportunity to take an exciting narrated ride across the largest artesian springs formation in the world. The transparent bottom of the boat allows you to see all different types of fish and plant life. Be sure to keep an eye out for the occasional gator sighting on the banks.

3.     Silver Moon Drive In

In Lakeland, just an hour drive from Orlando, you will find one of the last remaining drive-in theaters in the area. This drive-in is one of the cleanest and most affordable around. Double features are only 5 bucks a person, and on occasional weekends you may even be able to see 3 features for one low price. Treat yourself to some old-fashioned fun; what a nice classic activity to enjoy year-round!

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Beat the Caribbean Blues in the Tropical Oasis that is Key West

Beat the Caribbean Blues in the Tropical Oasis that is Key West

This 7-square-mile island feels like a beautiful tropical oasis. It’s allure stems not just from beautiful beaches and palm trees, but from the classical Caribbean homes and its eccentric vibes. It’s easy to find your groove in Key West—no matter where your interests lie. As in other parts of the Keys, nature plays a starring role here, with some breathtaking sunsets—cause for nightly celebration down on Mallory Square. Download the Key West Travel Guide and Offline Map and prepare for your trip down Highway One!

1.     Mallory Square

The fun begins in the hours leading to dusk where you’ll witness every single oddity and eccentric character on the island. Have a beer. And a conch fritter, and take a front-row seat to the music-filled mayhem. Once sunset arrives, all eyes turn to the water; and the showing comes crashing to an end shortly after the streaks of post-sunset gold, amber and lilac light up the evening sky.

2.     Fort Zachary Taylor State Park

“America’s Southernmost State Park” is home to an impressive fort, built in the mid-1800s that played roles in the American Civil War and in the Spanish-American War. The beach here is the best one Key West has to offer – it has white sand to lounge on (but is rocky in parts), water deep enough to swim in and tropical fish under the waves.

3.     Hemingway House

Key West’s biggest darling, Ernest Hemingway, lived in this gorgeous Spanish Colonial house from 1931 to 1940. Papa moved here in his early 1930s with wife No 2, a Vogue fashion editor and (former) friend of wife No 1 (he left the house when he ran off with wife No 3). The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber and The Green Hills of Africa were produced here, as well as many six-toed cats, whose descendants basically run the grounds.

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Abu Dhabi, Conquering the World One World Record at a Time

Abu Dhabi, Conquering the World One World Record at a Time

Abu Dhabi isn’t shy in breaking world records: the world’s largest hand-loomed carpet, the fastest rollercoaster, the highest high tea, the tower with the greatest lean, the largest cluster of cultural buildings in the 21st century—is there nothing the UAE capital can’t beat? Explore this exciting city where everything seems to set on hustle and bustle mode with the Abu Dhabi Travel Guide and Offline Map

1.     Emirates Palace

Dubai might have Burj Khalifa soaring up vertically, but Abu Dhabi has the Emirates Palace, which sprawls horizontally. It is regarded as the BIG hotel in the Gulf and consists of audacious domed gatehouse and flying ramps to the foyer, 114 domes, and a 1.3 kilometer private beach. To make it more glamorous it has 1,002 crystal chandeliers and 392 luxury rooms and suites. The great thing is you don’t have to check-in to check it out.

2.     Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque

The Grand Mosque is impressive to Abu Dhabi. Rising from its well manicured gardens are more than 80 marble domes on a roofline held aloft by 1,000 pillars. Delicate floral designs inlaid with semi-precious stones, such as red agate, amethyst, and jasper decorate a variety of marbles. It is a masterpiece of modern Islamic Architecture and design. Built by UAE’s first President, Sheikh Zayed, it can hold up to 50,000 worship goers and is one of the very few mosques to welcome non-muslims in the region.

3.     Louvre Abu Dhabi

The highly anticipated Louvre Abu Dhabi finally arrived in late 2017. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Jean Nouvel, this striking museum definitely astounds. The 23-gallery project featuring a contrasting medina-inspired sequence of white buildings flanking a centerpiece. The elaborate, 180-meter-wide filigree dome pays homage to desert-palm shading with its geometric openings represent interlaced palm leaves used in traditional roofing.

Abu Dhabi Guide for iPhone, iPad & AppleWatch

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Top Three Destinations in the Marvelous City of Rio de Janeiro

Top Three Destinations in the Marvelous City of Rio de Janeiro

Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa where the beaches are golden, the mountains lush, and the nightlife is filled with samba. This city certainly does not disappoint, but don’t take our word for it, go see it for yourself. Lushly forested mountains fringe the city, shimmering beaches trace the shoreline and a string of tiny islands lie scattered along the seafront. So download the Rio de Janeiro Travel Guide and Offline Map and start your adventure now!

1.     Ipanema Beach

Ipanema Beach is so famous that a song was named after it. Here you’ll enjoy a clearer and cleaner beach compared to that of Copacabana. The word ipanema is an indigenous word for “bad, dangerous waters”, which is not far off given the strong undertow and often oversized waves that crash onto the shore. The long stretch of sun-drenched sand is demarcated by posts, which mark off subcultures as diverse as the city itself.

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2.     Parque Nacional da Tijuca

The 39-square-kilometer tropical jungle preserve is extremely rich with what mother nature has to offer. It filled with beautiful tress, waterfalls, mountainous terrain, and high peaks. It’s hard to imagine what this place once was as Tijuca is all that’s left of the Atlantic rainforest that once surrounded Rio de Janeiro. Serious hikers are very fond of Tijuca as climbing the 1,012 meter summit of Pico da Tijuca offers you a majestic view.

3.     Cristo Redentor

Of course, we can never leave out the famous Christ the Redeemer. Standing atop Corcovado, the massive statue of Cristo Redentor gazes out over Rio. The mountain itself rises straight up from the city to 710 meters and at night the brightly lit 38-meter high open armed statue is visible from nearly every part of the city.

Rio de Janeiro Travel Guide for iPhone, iPad and AppleWatch

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Reason Why Ko Samui is Food for the Soul

Reason Why Ko Samui is Food for the Soul

If you’re looking for the perfect relax and unwind after stressful months of work then Ko Samui is the perfect getaway you’ve been dreaming of. Wether you’e sun-seeking, dozing in a hammock, feasting on world-class cuisine, partying by the beach or discovering wellness in an exclusive spa, Ko Samui has it covered. Discover this island paradise with the Ko Samui Travel Guide and Offline Map

.1.     Pristine Beaches

It’s hard to resist the deep azure of the sky and the gentle lapping of warm waves on the satin sands of Ko Samui. The island’s beaches are as diverse as they get. Head to Coco Tam’s in Fisherman’s village for some cocktails and serious chillaxing, Chaweng Beach for some sunrise and people-watching, and Mae Nam Beach for some napping before witnessing a magnificent sunset in the west coast. If this reason alone doesn’t tempt you too book that ticket, we don’t know what will.

2.     Mouthwatering Cuisine

Dining in Ko Samui is remarkable in itself, but pair it with the island’s seductive sands then that’s takes it to top indulgence right there. From the simplest of Thai dishes to scorching regional curries, and plates hopping with flavor on seaside tables, you’ll definitely be spoiled for choice. Whatever suits your fancy, don’t ever overlook the flimsy wooden shack eateries. There you’ll find the best meals true-blue locals will not stop gushing about.

3.     Pamper Yourself

If you thought the beach and food was the ultimate pampering then you thought wrong. The island is filled to brim with places that will most definitely spoil your mind, body, and soul. Cleansing fasts, yoga, tai-chi, herbal steam treatments, and chakra-balancing—whatever you seek for full-on pampering, you’ll find it here. And while you’re at it ease away those aches and pains the island’s numerous spas can ease them to a next level of serenity.

Ko Samui Travel Guide for iPhone, iPad & AppleWatch

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Expect the Unexpected in Bilbao, Spain

Expect the Unexpected in Bilbao, Spain

Alluring architecture, an unexpected dining culture, and stunning landscapes that surround the city center; Bilbao is one of the marvelous hidden gems of the Basque Country. What once was an industrial city has transformed into a city of art after the unveiling of Frank Gehry’s shimmering titanium-clad Guggenheim museum. Download the Bilbao Travel Guide and Offline Map to get to know this unexpected city of beauty.

1.     Museo Guggenheim Bilbao

It’s hard to imagine a more mesmerizing sight than the shimmering titanium Museo Guggenheim Bilbao. It is definitely one of modern architecture’s most iconic buildings. Frank Gehry’s work helped lift Bilbao out of its post-industrial depression and catapulted it into the 21st century forefront. It sparked the city’s inspired regeneration, stimulated further development, and placed Bilbao in the international art and tourism spotlight.

2.     Bilbao Old Quarter

Bilbao’s atmospheric old quarter, Casco Viejo, may be compact but it is brimming with charming streets, boisterous bars, plenty of quirky and indie shops that will keep you busy for hours. The original seven streets date back to the 1400’s, so expect a lot of photogenic, colorful houses that line the main streets. The 14th-century gothic Catedral de Santiago has a splendid Renaissance portico and pretty little cloister you should not miss visiting.

3.     Basilica de Begoña

Towering over Casco Viejo from atop a nearby hill is this 16th-century basilica. It’s mainly Gothic in look, although there are still touches of Renaissance such as the arched main entrance, crept in during its century-long construction. The austere vaulted interior gleams by a gold altarpiece which contains a statue of the Virgin Begoña, the patron saint of Biscay.

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The Hills are Alive with the Sound of Music in Salzburg

The Hills are Alive with the Sound of Music in Salzburg

Some come here for the legendary Mozart. Some come for a more recent musical legacy, The Sound of Music. Either way, one thing is for sure, people stay for its spellbinding beauty. This city in north-central Austria is not only known for its musical legacies, but also for being the epitome of Baroque architecture, which is very much evident in the streets of old town. Nestles bedside the fast-flowing Salzach River, this wondrous city gives you spectacular views of beautiful spires and domes, a formidable clifftop fortress from a distance, and the endearing mountains from afar. So what are you waiting for? The music is calling! Download the Salzburg Travel Guide and Offline Map now.

1.      Festung Hohensalzburg

The city’s most visible icon is this mighty, 900-year old-old cliff-top fortress. The fortress is considered one of the biggest and best preserved in all of Europe. Built in 1077 as a humble bailey at present is now a formidable fortress thanks to Leonard von Keutschach, prince-archbishop of Salzburg from the late 1400’s to the late 1500’s. One of the highlights of anyone’s visit is the Golden Hall where lavish banquets used to take place under a gold-studded ceiling imitating a starry night.

2.      Schloss Mirabell

Built in 1606 by prince-archbishop Wolf Dietrich to impress his mistress, this splendid palace with a lavish interior, replete with stucco, marble, and frescoes. Its famed Marble Hall provides a sublime backdrop for evening concerts. Its gardens are a thing to behold as well. Here you’ll find the Pegasus statue, the steps and the gnomes of the Dwarf Garden where the von Trapp children practiced their “Do-Re-Mi”.

3.      Erzabtei St Peter

A Frankish missionary named Rupert founded this abbey and monastery in around 700, making it the oldest in the German-speaking world. Though the vaulted Romanesque portal remains, today’s church is very much baroque with rococo stucco, statues, and striking altar paintings. Its cemetery is also home to the catacombs—cave-like chapels and crypts hewn out of the Monchsberg cliff face. The graves itself are also intricate works of art made from stone and filigree wrought-iron crosses.

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From Sleepy to Metropolitan, Booming Portland

From Sleepy to Metropolitan, Booming Portland

What once seemed like a sleepy town, Oregon's largest city is now booming with rich advancements any metropolis would envy. The grubby dive bars have been replaced by coffee roasteries and craft breweries on just about every block. And the food carts--more and better than ever. If it sounds like Portland has become a concrete jungle, fret now. There is an abundance of natural beauty – perfect parks with leafy trees and a view of Mount Hood on the horizon. Download the Portland Travel Guide and Offline Map and go see for yourself!

1.  Pittock Mansion

This grand and beautiful 1914 mansion was built by pioneer-entrepreneur Henry Pittock, who revitalized the Oregonian newspaper; his wife, Georgiana, also a pioneer, started the earliest of Portland's annual Rose Festivals. Guided tours are available, but it's also worth visiting the grounds simply to have a picnic while taking in the spectacular views. If you're up for a wander, the mansion lies along the Wildwood Trail in Forest Park, with dozens of miles of connecting trails branching off it.

2. Forest Park

Abutting the more manicured Washington Park to the south is the far wilder 5100-acre Forest Park, a temperate rainforest that harbors plants and animals and hosts an avid hiking fraternity. The Portland Audubon Society maintains a bookstore, a wildlife-rehabilitation center and 4.5 miles of trails within its Forest Park sanctuary. It's worth visiting the grounds just to check out the spectacular views – bring a picnic.

3. Pioneer Courthouse Square

One of Portland's grandest Victorian hotels once stood here, but it fell into disrepair and was torn down in 1951. Later the city decided to build Pioneer Courthouse Sq, and grassroots support resulted in a program that encouraged citizens to buy and personalize the bricks that eventually built the square. Names include Sherlock Holmes, William Shakespeare, and Elvis Presley. Across 6th Ave is the Pioneer Courthouse. Built in 1875, this was the legal center of 19th-century Portland.

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Rijksmuseum, Home to the Netherlands’ Art Heroes

Rijksmuseum, Home to the Netherlands’ Art Heroes

See one of the world's finest art museums, packed with more than 7,000 masterpieces over 1.5 kilometers of galleries. The museum also showcases art by local masters such as Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Van Gogh. But there's more to do at the Rijksmuseum than just art, stroll around their sculpture studded, lush gardens or dine in their Michelin star in-house Rijks restaurant. Whatever you do, don't forget to do it with the Rijksmuseum Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1. The Night Watch

Known to be Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn's most famous and largest canvas it comes to know surprise that this piece attracts thousands of visitors. Rembrandt was the first to paint lively figures in a group portrait. Made for the Arquebusiers guild hall survived its cutting to fit into the Town Hall in 1715. And during World War II, it was rolled into a cylinder form and moved out of Amsterdam.  In the last 40 years there have been two attacks of vandalism on the painting

2. Vincent Van Gogh's Self-portrait

The master's self-portrait represents many facets of his tragic story. In 1888, Van Gogh moved to France and experienced great creativity, but alongside is came tensions and dementia and at one point ended up cutting his own ear. After the incident, he checked himself into a mental institution. His creativity, although coupled with madness, never wavered until he moved to Auvers-sur-Oise in 1890, where he eventually committed suicide.

3. Banquet at the Crossbowmen’s Guild

Bartholomeus van der Helst's most famous work was done in 1648, depicting the signing of the Treaty of Münster, which marked an end to the war with Spain. The banquet takes place at the Amsterdam crossbowmen’s guild. It is a symbolic meal of peace, where Amsterdam's reconciliation politics are highlighted. But this isn't just why it's so famous. If you look closely you will see fine details in the painting that you wouldn't at just a glance.

Rijksmuseum Guide for iPhone, iPad & AppleWatch

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Malta, Paradise Found at the Center of the Mediterranean

Malta, Paradise Found at the Center of the Mediterranean

This tiny archipelago may be small but it packs a punch when it comes to glorious landscapes. It boasts prehistoric temples, fossil-studded cliffs, hidden coves, and thrilling scuba diving. Its cuisine also should not be overlooked; traditional Maltese food mixes Sicilian and Middle Eastern flavors while making use of local ingredients such as rabbit and honey. If that's not enough to make you book that ticket Malta, we don't know what will. While you're at it download the Malta Travel Guide and Offline and start exploring.

1. Valletta

The capital of Malta and a UNESCO World Heritage Site is often dubbed as "one of the most concentrated historic areas in the world". It was built by the Knights of Saint John on a peninsula that's only 1 kilometer by 600 meters. It retains its 16th-century allure and elegance to this day.  New museums, restored golden-stone fortresses, and new hotels ushered Valletta's status as European Capital of Culture for 2018.

2. Blue Lagoon

The Blue Lagoon in Comino is one of the island's biggest draws. It is a sheltered cove between the western end of the island and Cominotto--an uninhabited islet. It's famed for its white-sand seabed and clear waters. The blue is so bright and intense that you would think a real-life Instagram filter was used. There are top-notch swimming and snorkeling here, plus you can swim over to Cominotto.

3. Hal Saflieni Hypogeum

The Hypogeum, from the Greek, meaning underground is a subterranean necropolis, discovered during building work in 1902. To visit is to step into a mysterious and silent world. Its halls, chambers, and passages, immaculately hewn out of the rock, cover some 500-square meters; it is thought to date from around 3600 to 3000 BC, and an estimated 7000 bodies may have been interred here.

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