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What to See in France's Very Own Orsay Museum

What to See in France's Very Own Orsay Museum

The glorious Gare d’Orsay railway station now stands proud as the country's home for its national collection of the impressionist, postimpressionist and art-nouveau movements spanning from 1848 to 1914. The museum itself is an art-nouveau showpiece. The must-see on every visitor's list is Orsay Museum's painting collections, centered on the world's largest collection of impressionist and post-impressionist art. Download the Orsay Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map and take a trip to France now.

1. Polar Bear

Considered as the museum's most iconic work, Polar Bear is one of the standouts by Francois Pompon. The master himself was once an assistant to Camille Claudel and Auguste Rodin who later on struck out on his own and create his animal-inspired works. Eschewing realism, he sought to communicate the barest minimum of the animal and upon closer inspection, the animal begins to fade away – leaving only marble.

2. Olympia

Edouard Manet was fondly known as the bad boy of the art world in his days. His most controversial work, Olympia, depicts a nude prostitute who looks calmly at the viewer and in complete indifference of her nakedness. This was a huge clash against the classical tropes of blushing virgins and highborn women in art, which ignited a huge conversation about the representation of women in art.

3. Poppy Field

This dreamy, peaceful landscape painted by Claude Monet is one of the artist’s most famous works. Painted after he had moved from England to laidback Argenteuil, the impressionist artist produced vibrant colors to channel the spirit of a beautiful sunny day in nature. The striking reds of wild poppies against a muted green background serve to make the piece all the more vivid, heightened only by the black and white figures slipping through the field.

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Top 3 Reasons to Visit Versailles Palace, the Home of French Royalty

Top 3 Reasons to Visit Versailles Palace, the Home of French Royalty

If you think France can't get any more romantic and scenic then you have got to visit Versailles Palace. Not only is the palace located in Versailles a picturesque site filled with outstanding artworks and architecture, but it also holds five centuries of history. What used to be home to the French royals until the French Revolution dates back to the 11th century. Today, It is now open as a museum and is a very popular tourist attraction. Set forth to the beautiful château with the Versailles Palace Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1.     The Grand Palace

The Palace has been listed for 30 years as a World Heritage and is considered one of the greatest achievements in French 17th century art. What used to be Louis XIII's old hunting pavilion was transformed and continued to be embellished by France's succeeding kings. Starting from his son, Louis XIV, who installed the Court and government within the pavilion in 1682. At present, the palace contains 2,300 rooms and its area expands to up to 63,154 square meters.

Versailles Palace travel guide for iPhone and iPad

2.      The Estate of Trianon

When the Royals needed a break from the prying eyes and ears of the public they sought refuge in the Estate Trianon. Although its construction began under Louis XIV, it's more famously for Queen Marie-Antoinette. She was known to regularly visit the Petit Trianon, where she had beautifully landscaped gardens commissioned creating a rustic atmosphere for intimate moments. Here you'll be able to see many of the estate's architectural gems.

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3.     The Royal Stables

Construction of the Great and Small stables was built under Louis XIV rule and is considered the greatest royal construction project for housing horses ever. Situated across the Palace, both stable stand at the edge of Place d’Armes. The placement and size of the Royal Stables is a testament to the importance of horses in the Ancien Régime.

 

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Museum Hopping in Paris, the Art Capital of France

Museum Hopping in Paris, the Art Capital of France

Paris, the city of love, but did you also know it's hailed as the capital city of art in France? This city alone is home to about 200 or so museums. With that being said any art lover would never be able to resist Paris' charm. But with that many museums and not enough time to spend in this lovely city, we give you three absolutely unmissable museums. So what are you waiting for? Get that itinerary ready and don't forget to download the Paris Museums Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1.     The Louvre

Probably the most iconic museum in Paris and for good reason. It's the world's largest museum and considered a city within the city. Not only is it filled to the brim with artistic glories the museum itself is a masterpiece in its own right. It houses over 35,000 works of art and artifacts from the Egyptians, Etruscans, Greeks, and Romans. The main draw of the museum is its painting and sculpture collection. It is in fact, home to the famous Mona Lisa.

Louvre Museum in your pocket

2.      Musée d’Orsay

Imagine a museum set in an old train station dating back the 1900's. Well, imagine no more because Musée d’Orsay’s is exactly just that. This quaint museum houses an enormous collection of works by Delacroix, Monet, Courbet, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec and many others. In 2011, the museum reopened its most important rooms that are dedicated to the artworks of Courbet and Van Gogh. If you ever need a break from walking around stop by its submarine themed cafe tucked behind a clock designed by the Campana brothers.

3.     Musée du Quai Branly

If you've already gotten your fill of European art then head over to the Musée du Quai Branly. This museum is uniquely surrounded by lush greenery and nestled on the banks of the Seine. It's dedicated to the ethnic art of Africa, Oceania, Asia, and the Americas. Artifacts on display include a tenth-century anthropomorphic Dogon statue from Mali, Vietnamese costumes, Gabonese masks, Aztec statues, Peruvian feather tunics, and rare frescoes from Ethiopia.

Paris museums travel guide for iPhone and iPad

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What to See at the Palace of Versailles, Home of French Royalty

What to See at the Palace of Versailles, Home of French Royalty

The royal palace of Versailles with its expansive gardens and massively intricate architecture is considered one of, if not the most, famous attractions in the Île-de-France region of France. Built by King Louis XIV, it has been home to three generations of French kings and queens from 1682 until the beginning of the French Revolution in 1798. As a result, each monarch was able to add new additions to the palace estate making even grander and majestic than it originally was. There is a lot see at here as the entire estate is 2,014 acres and so it's best to plan ahead. Be sure to download the Palace of Versailles Travel Guide and Offline Map to help you to maximize your trip.

1.      Estate of Trianon

Thies intimate estate is famously associated with Queen Marie-Antoinette and thus fondly called the Marie-Antoinette estate. Construction of the estate started under King Louis XIV. It was once called the "Marble Trianon" for the unique pink marbles panels that adorned the palace's facades. Marie-Antoinette is known to seek refuge and spent most of her time away from the prying eyes of the royal court in the marvelous rustic-style cottages of the Trianon. The cottages are surrounded by marvelous gardens with ornate geometric flowerbeds and tens of thousands of flowers.

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2.      Hall of Mirrors

The Hall of Mirrors is the most prominent feature at the Palace of Versailles. It was originally built as a terrace that stood between the King and Queen's bedchambers. The open-air terrace overlooking the gardens was soon remodeled due to being exposed to bad weather. When the hall was finished it served as a passageway and waiting area to impress his guests. The Treaty of Versailles, which officially brought the First World War to an end, was signed here in the Hall of Mirrors on June 28, 1919.

Versailles Travel Guide for iPhone, iPad and AppleWatch

3.      Leto’s Fountain

The palace estate has eight majestic fountains that you can visit, but one of the notable ones is the Leto's Fountain. It was inspired by The Metamorphoses by Ovide. It illustrates the story of Leto, the mother of Apollo and Diana, protecting her children from the insults of the peasants of Lycia and pleading with Jupiter to avenge her. Jupiter agrees and turns the inhabitants of Lycia into frogs and lizards. The central marble pyramid depicts Leto and her children.

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Travel Paris Through Famous Movie Locations

Travel Paris Through Famous Movie Locations

Film-induced tourism is a rapidly growing segment of cultural tourism, where locations that appeared on film or television become tourist attractions.

This niche is relatively new, but, it’s already considered as an emerging driver for tourism development in many countries. Experts say it will only grow stronger as the entertainment industry becomes more global and the price of air travel more affordable.

And, as a popular location for many Hollywood films, Paris is one of the cities that’s hoping to boost their tourist numbers from the magic of the movies.

So, if you want to recreate your favorite movie and TV moment check out this list of must-see movie scene locations in Paris.

Café des Deux Moulins (Amélie)

Located at 15 rue Lepic in the Montmartre area, this cozy café shot to fame after it was featured in the global blockbuster hit Amélie. There’s no shortage of Amélie memorabilia in the café, from the gnome to a selection of dishes from Les Plat du Jour d’Amélie.

Shakespeare and Company (Before Sunset)

This independent bookstore located at the La Rive Gauche, was the location of Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy’s characters’ reunion scene in Richard Linklater’s Before Sunset. And, with an immaculate view of the Seine, how can anyone not fall in love?

Hôtel Raphael  (Hotel Chevalier)

This 5-star hotel in Avenue Kléber is the site of Wes Anderson’s 13-minute short film featuring Natalie Portman and Jason Schwartzman. The quirky love story served as a prequel to his adventure comedy feature The Darjeeling Limited.

Père-Lachaise Cemetery (Paris, je t’aime)

Père-Lachaise located in Paris’ 20th district is the location of Wes Craven’s short in the anthology film Paris, je t’aime. It’s about a couple whose failing relationship is saved by the ghost of Oscar Wilde. Aside from Wilde’s, you can also find the graves of Balzac, Chopin, Edith Piaf, and Jim Morrison in this cemetery.

Paris Best Places to Travel. Peré Lachaise Cementery
Paris Best Places to Travel. Peré Lachaise Cementery

Musée des Arts Forains (Midnight in Paris)

Although this Woody Allen movie is teeming with well-known Parisian destinations – Église Saint-Étienne du Mont, Pont Alexandre III, Musée Rodin - Musée des Arts Forains captures the movie’s love for the Belle Epoque era the most. Book a tour if you can want to take a try out antique carnival rides.

Pont de Bir-Hakeim (Inception)

This bridge connecting Paris’ 15th and 16th districts is where Leonardo DiCaprio taught Ellen Page how to build dreams in Christopher Nolan’s 2010 sci-film. It was also featured on the small screen, as the highlight of Ben (Adam Scott) and Leslie’s (Amy Poehler) Paris trip in Parks and Recreation.

Paris Travel Guide for iPhone and iPad
Paris Travel Guide for iPhone and iPad

If you want a vacation that’s just like in the movies, make sure to download the Paris Travel Guide and Offline City Maps app. For more information check out eTips for more suggestions on famous movie locations around Paris.