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modern

Why You Should Never Miss the Guggenheim Museum When Visiting the Big Apple

Why You Should Never Miss the Guggenheim Museum When Visiting the Big Apple

The Guggenheim Museum in New York houses works by art heavyweights such as Kandinsky, Picasso and Jackson Pollock. But the real draw is the temporary exhibitions by some of the great visionary artists of today. Not to mention the stunning conical white spiral in which these great artworks are displayed is reason enough to visit. Download the Guggenheim Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map to help your art outing.

1.  Woman Ironing by Pablo Picasso

During Picasso's Blue Period, he famously depicted peasants, laborers, beggars and other downtrodden folks in shades of blue. Though this long-limbed, hunched woman is shown in grays and blacks, she represents that same period of gloom. It's a kind of metaphor for the poor in general, the forever oppressed.

2. "Untitled” by Mark Rothko

This classic Mark Rothko piece was painted between 1952 and 1953 and features his iconic large-scale blocks of bright colors. Rothko, an American artist, is one of the central figures of the New York School, who creates his abstract pieces to illicit “basic human emotions — tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on,” from the audience, according to Rothko himself.

3. “The Renowned Orders Of The Night” by Anselm Kiefer

Anselm Kiefer was born in Germany just before the end of World War II, and many of his artworks explore the themes surrounding war, as well as the rise of fascism. This piece, entitled “The Renowned Orders Of The Night,” features the artist himself lying on a bed of dry, cracked earth, as if he were a corpse, under a vast starry sky. In his later artworks, Kiefer became obsessed with the night sky, and he created a few different artworks exploring its beauty.

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What to See in London's Renowned Tate Modern

What to See in London's Renowned Tate Modern

This modern and contemporary art gallery is known to be one of London's most amazing attractions. What used to be Bankside Power Station on the South of the Millenium Bridge was revamped into what is now known as Tate Modern. The mesmerizing synthesis of modern art and industrial brick design brings about an extraordinarily successful in bringing challenging work to the masses. Download the Tate Modern Travel Guide and Offline Map now and start exploring.

1. Marilyn Diptych

Andy Warhol is a household name in the world of art, and this piece on Marilyn Monroe is eerily more relevant in today’s picture and pop-obsessed culture than ever before. Made in the months following the star’s death, Warhol combines ideas of finitude and the cult of celebrity by repeating the same image of the starlet with a gradual fade out that hints at mortality as it is contrasted with the acid bright images on the left.

2. Nude Woman With Necklace

One of Picasso’s best-known works, this colorful portrait bursts with unbridled energy and life. It depicts Picasso’s second wife, Jacqueline Roque, and her enigmatic facial expression is full of enough mystery to rival the Mona Lisa – she is at once vulnerable and defiant. The complexity of her portrait and the chaotic figuring of the body as simultaneous landscape and natural energies encapsulate the turbulent nature of their marriage.

3. Spatial Concept ‘Waiting’

Modern art famously challenges traditional artwork, forcing the viewer to scratch the surface and consider the true nature of artistic representation. Perhaps no work does so more simply and effectively than Spatial Concept ‘Waiting’, which presents the viewer with a boldly slashed canvas and asks them to reflect on the nature of the image and the materiality of the painting.

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