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Top 3 Must-sees in Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy

Top 3 Must-sees in Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy

The U-shaped Palazzo degli Uffizi was built between 1560 to 1580 that was used to house government offices. Today, it houses the world's greatest collection of Italian Renaissance art. The collection, which was originally the Medici family's private collection, was bequeathed to the city in 1743. The expansive collection contains some of Italy's best-known paintings. Download the Uffizi Gallery Travel Guide and Offline Map and discover art at its finest.

1.     Tuscan Masters: 13th to 14th Centuries

As you arrive in the Primo Corridoio on the second floor, you will be greeted by Rooms 2 to 7, which are dedicated to pre- and early Renaissance Tuscan art. Among the 13th-century Sienese works displayed in Room 2 are three large altarpieces from Florentine churches by Duccio di Buoninsegna, Cimabue, and Giotto. These clearly reflect the transition from the Gothic to the nascent Renaissance style.

2.      Renaissance Pioneers

Florence's victory over the Sienese at the Battle of San Romano, near Pisa, in 1432, is brought to life with outstanding realism and increased use of perspective in Paolo Uccello's magnificent Battaglia di San Romano in Room 8. In the same room, don't miss the notable Madonna con Bambino e due angeli (Madonna and Child with Two Angels) by Fra' Filippo Lippi, a scandalous Carmelite monk who married a nun from Prato.

3.     Botticelli Room

The spectacular Sala del Botticelli is one of the Uffizi's most visited rooms. Of the 18 Botticelli works displayed in the Uffizi in all, the iconic La nascita di Venere (The Birth of Venus), Primavera (Spring) and Madonna del Magnificat (Madonna of the Magnificat) are the best known by the Renaissance master known for his ethereal figures.

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Reasons why The British Museum is London's Most Visited Attraction

Reasons why The British Museum is London's Most Visited Attraction

We've talked about the MET, the MoMa, and SFMoMa, but now it's high time we talk about London's very own British Museum. Considered as the country's largest and one of the oldest museums in the world, it boasts a wondrous collection of Egyptian, Etruscan, Greek, Roman, European and Middle Eastern galleries. Be among the 6.5 million visitors annually and download the British Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map now.

1.     It's Free

The British Museum in itself is a work of art. But the architecture and the pieces of rich history within its walls isn't just the reason why it draws the crowds. It isn't much of a wonder why it draws millions of visitors each year as visiting the British Museum is for free. Yes, we're not kidding here. You can enjoy a slew of the best art pieces in the world for free. If that's not enough to entice you to visit, we don't know what will.

2.      The Egyptian Rooms

See ancient mummies for yourself and if you think that's cool enough, think again. Here, you will also learn a great deal great deal of Egyptian history--from its early years of Rapid advances in the technology to the significance of death and the afterlife to Egyptians who will be in awe at every turn. If you're up for some truth in gossip, in these rooms you will also learn about Cleopatra's unbelievable true story.

3.     The Middle-Eastern Rooms

Middle-Eastern history and artifacts might be overshadowed in other museums, but in the British Museums, it is definitely one of the stars. In Room 10, for example, you will catch a glimpse at the extravagant hunting rituals of the last great Assyrian king, Ashurbanipal, who lived between 668 and around 630 B.C. The sculpted reliefs on alabaster panels that line this gallery mark the king's prowess and power.

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