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art

Why You Should Never Miss the Guggenheim Museum When Visiting the Big Apple

Why You Should Never Miss the Guggenheim Museum When Visiting the Big Apple

The Guggenheim Museum in New York houses works by art heavyweights such as Kandinsky, Picasso and Jackson Pollock. But the real draw is the temporary exhibitions by some of the great visionary artists of today. Not to mention the stunning conical white spiral in which these great artworks are displayed is reason enough to visit. Download the Guggenheim Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map to help your art outing.

1.  Woman Ironing by Pablo Picasso

During Picasso's Blue Period, he famously depicted peasants, laborers, beggars and other downtrodden folks in shades of blue. Though this long-limbed, hunched woman is shown in grays and blacks, she represents that same period of gloom. It's a kind of metaphor for the poor in general, the forever oppressed.

2. "Untitled” by Mark Rothko

This classic Mark Rothko piece was painted between 1952 and 1953 and features his iconic large-scale blocks of bright colors. Rothko, an American artist, is one of the central figures of the New York School, who creates his abstract pieces to illicit “basic human emotions — tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on,” from the audience, according to Rothko himself.

3. “The Renowned Orders Of The Night” by Anselm Kiefer

Anselm Kiefer was born in Germany just before the end of World War II, and many of his artworks explore the themes surrounding war, as well as the rise of fascism. This piece, entitled “The Renowned Orders Of The Night,” features the artist himself lying on a bed of dry, cracked earth, as if he were a corpse, under a vast starry sky. In his later artworks, Kiefer became obsessed with the night sky, and he created a few different artworks exploring its beauty.

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What to See in London's Renowned Tate Modern

What to See in London's Renowned Tate Modern

This modern and contemporary art gallery is known to be one of London's most amazing attractions. What used to be Bankside Power Station on the South of the Millenium Bridge was revamped into what is now known as Tate Modern. The mesmerizing synthesis of modern art and industrial brick design brings about an extraordinarily successful in bringing challenging work to the masses. Download the Tate Modern Travel Guide and Offline Map now and start exploring.

1. Marilyn Diptych

Andy Warhol is a household name in the world of art, and this piece on Marilyn Monroe is eerily more relevant in today’s picture and pop-obsessed culture than ever before. Made in the months following the star’s death, Warhol combines ideas of finitude and the cult of celebrity by repeating the same image of the starlet with a gradual fade out that hints at mortality as it is contrasted with the acid bright images on the left.

2. Nude Woman With Necklace

One of Picasso’s best-known works, this colorful portrait bursts with unbridled energy and life. It depicts Picasso’s second wife, Jacqueline Roque, and her enigmatic facial expression is full of enough mystery to rival the Mona Lisa – she is at once vulnerable and defiant. The complexity of her portrait and the chaotic figuring of the body as simultaneous landscape and natural energies encapsulate the turbulent nature of their marriage.

3. Spatial Concept ‘Waiting’

Modern art famously challenges traditional artwork, forcing the viewer to scratch the surface and consider the true nature of artistic representation. Perhaps no work does so more simply and effectively than Spatial Concept ‘Waiting’, which presents the viewer with a boldly slashed canvas and asks them to reflect on the nature of the image and the materiality of the painting.

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Rijksmuseum, Home to the Netherlands’ Art Heroes

Rijksmuseum, Home to the Netherlands’ Art Heroes

See one of the world's finest art museums, packed with more than 7,000 masterpieces over 1.5 kilometers of galleries. The museum also showcases art by local masters such as Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Van Gogh. But there's more to do at the Rijksmuseum than just art, stroll around their sculpture studded, lush gardens or dine in their Michelin star in-house Rijks restaurant. Whatever you do, don't forget to do it with the Rijksmuseum Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1. The Night Watch

Known to be Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn's most famous and largest canvas it comes to know surprise that this piece attracts thousands of visitors. Rembrandt was the first to paint lively figures in a group portrait. Made for the Arquebusiers guild hall survived its cutting to fit into the Town Hall in 1715. And during World War II, it was rolled into a cylinder form and moved out of Amsterdam.  In the last 40 years there have been two attacks of vandalism on the painting

2. Vincent Van Gogh's Self-portrait

The master's self-portrait represents many facets of his tragic story. In 1888, Van Gogh moved to France and experienced great creativity, but alongside is came tensions and dementia and at one point ended up cutting his own ear. After the incident, he checked himself into a mental institution. His creativity, although coupled with madness, never wavered until he moved to Auvers-sur-Oise in 1890, where he eventually committed suicide.

3. Banquet at the Crossbowmen’s Guild

Bartholomeus van der Helst's most famous work was done in 1648, depicting the signing of the Treaty of Münster, which marked an end to the war with Spain. The banquet takes place at the Amsterdam crossbowmen’s guild. It is a symbolic meal of peace, where Amsterdam's reconciliation politics are highlighted. But this isn't just why it's so famous. If you look closely you will see fine details in the painting that you wouldn't at just a glance.

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3 Compelling Reasons to Visit the National Gallery of Art in Washington

3 Compelling Reasons to Visit the National Gallery of Art in Washington

There are various reasons to visit the National Gallery of Art in Washington, its collection of paintings, prints, photos, sculpture, and decorative arts traces the development of Western Art from the Middle Ages up to the present. This includes the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile created by Alexander Calder. Download the National Gallery of Art in Washington Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1. Ginevra de’ Benci

The portrait of Ginevra de’ Benci is the only Leonardo da Vinci painting on public display not just in the District, but in all the Americas. The late 15th-century oil is more austere than da Vinci’s best-known portrait, made about 25 years later. There’s no hint of a smile on the face of this young woman, probably 16 and newly engaged when she posed.

2. Electronic Superhighway

Approach the tiny screen that represents the District in “Electronic Superhighway,” and you’ll see yourself live on closed-circuit TV. That’s one of many playful touches in Nam June Paik’s 40-foot-wide assemblage, which represents the United States in images fed from 50 DVD players to 335 television sets, plus that D.C. one. The screens show sweeping landscapes, iconic products and clips from Hollywood movies, all hurtling by as if glimpsed from a car racing at the speed limit.

3. Adams Memorial

There are works by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in the Smithsonian and the National Gallery of Art (the plaster version of his famous memorial to Robert Gould Shaw), but one of the most evocative of his statues isn’t in a museum, but rather in Rock Creek Cemetery. Commissioned by the great American writer Henry Adams, the Adams Memorial is a haunting, shrouded figure, set alone in a peaceful copse, a powerful memorial to Adams’s wife, who died by her own hand in 1885.

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Outstanding Reasons to Visit the Hermitage Museum in Russia

Outstanding Reasons to Visit the Hermitage Museum in Russia

The Hermitage Museum does not disappoint and it certainly lives up to its reputation. You can get lost for days just soaking up all the treasures in its 360 rooms. And to think what's on display is a mere fraction of over three million items in their collection--this amounts to a comprehensive history of Western European art. Catherine the Great, one of the greatest art collectors of all time, began the collection. Visiting the museum requires planning so download the Hermitage Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map and start now!

1. Portrait of Soler

One of the most emotive paintings from Picasso’s ‘Blue Period’, Portrait of Soler is a picture of a young man sitting alone in a café, and is widely considered a comment on loneliness and isolation within the artist’s own life. Painted in 1903, using his good friend and patron, Soleras as his model, Picasso expresses melancholy through a powerful use of color, expression, and lighting – or lack thereof.

2. St. Luke Drawing the Virgin

A significant artwork by Belgian painter Rogier van der Weyden, St Luke Drawing the Virgin portrays an artist--perhaps a self-portrait of van der Weyden himself--sketching the Virgin Mary as she cradles baby Jesus. Interestingly, the canvas was initially two separate pieces, one half owned by Tsar Nicholas I, and the other by Alexander III. If you look closely, you can still see the vertical join.

3. Head of Athena

There are a number of sculptures of Greek Goddess Athena throughout the State Hermitage Museum, but the Head of Athena is arguably the most captivating. Dating back to the 2nd century, the marble is immaculately preserved, so her powerful and wise gaze continues to be as striking as it would have been when it was created.

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Top 3 Must-sees in Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy

Top 3 Must-sees in Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy

The U-shaped Palazzo degli Uffizi was built between 1560 to 1580 that was used to house government offices. Today, it houses the world's greatest collection of Italian Renaissance art. The collection, which was originally the Medici family's private collection, was bequeathed to the city in 1743. The expansive collection contains some of Italy's best-known paintings. Download the Uffizi Gallery Travel Guide and Offline Map and discover art at its finest.

1.     Tuscan Masters: 13th to 14th Centuries

As you arrive in the Primo Corridoio on the second floor, you will be greeted by Rooms 2 to 7, which are dedicated to pre- and early Renaissance Tuscan art. Among the 13th-century Sienese works displayed in Room 2 are three large altarpieces from Florentine churches by Duccio di Buoninsegna, Cimabue, and Giotto. These clearly reflect the transition from the Gothic to the nascent Renaissance style.

2.      Renaissance Pioneers

Florence's victory over the Sienese at the Battle of San Romano, near Pisa, in 1432, is brought to life with outstanding realism and increased use of perspective in Paolo Uccello's magnificent Battaglia di San Romano in Room 8. In the same room, don't miss the notable Madonna con Bambino e due angeli (Madonna and Child with Two Angels) by Fra' Filippo Lippi, a scandalous Carmelite monk who married a nun from Prato.

3.     Botticelli Room

The spectacular Sala del Botticelli is one of the Uffizi's most visited rooms. Of the 18 Botticelli works displayed in the Uffizi in all, the iconic La nascita di Venere (The Birth of Venus), Primavera (Spring) and Madonna del Magnificat (Madonna of the Magnificat) are the best known by the Renaissance master known for his ethereal figures.

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Visiting the Superstar of Modern Art, the MoMa

Visiting the Superstar of Modern Art, the MoMa

We're not exaggerating when we say superstar we mean superstar. Since its founding in 1929, this museum has featured almost 200,000 pieces of modern art by heavyweights such as Picasso, Warhol Van Gogh, Pollock, and so many more. It has documented the creative emergence of ideas and movements throughout the late 19th century. This is the place to be for both art enthusiasts and novices. Download the Museum of Modern Art Travel Guide and Offline Map and have a peek at your next art destination.

1.     The Fifth Floor

We suggest you head straight to the fifth floor and progress through the galleries in numerical order. This takes you on a chronological ride through the development of modern art. On this floor, you will begin your journey with some of the most notable pieces of modern art in the world. One of them is Vincent Van Gogh's The Starry Night. It depicts a turbulent sky over Saint Remy, where Van Gogh himself was confined in a mental asylum.

2.      The Fourth Floor

Here you will be left in awe with Jackson Pollock's One, which that is considered a masterpiece of the "drip" technique. And it is also one of Pollock's largest paintings. Andy Warhol's seminal work of Pop Art, Campbell's Soup Can, is also one of the stars on this floor. Warhol used familiar images that everyone can relate to and in this case, he used thirty-two varieties of soup offered by Campbell's--a staple of American diet during his time.

3.     The Persistence of Memory

Probably one of the world's most well-known example of modern art, Salvador Dali's masterpiece showcases his penchant for Surrealism and in this piece the theme is time. A desert landscape that contains melting watches, ants, and a grotesque object in the center that resembles Dali's face profile.

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Prado Museum, the Window the Spanish Soul

Prado Museum, the Window the Spanish Soul

Being in awe when visiting Prado Museum is considered an understatement. Don't take out word for it, go see it yourself! With more than 7,000 paintings in their collections. What was once a grand palace now turned museum, it is a must see when visiting if you ever make your way to Madrid. And how can you not when the city itself is already filled with so much culture and beautiful art in itself. So what are you waiting for? Download the Prado Museum Travel Guide and Offline Map now!

1.     History

The neoclassical Palacio de Villanueva was completed in 1785 and what is now the museum's Western Wing. It was originally born as a house of science and later became a barracks for Napoleon's cavalry troops. The building itself is already beaming with history. In 1814, King Fernando VII decided to use the palace as a museum. Five years later the Museo del Prado opened with 311 Spanish paintings on display.

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2.      Goya

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes is a staple name in the Prado Museum. His work can be found on all three floors of the Prado. In Room 65, Goya’s El dos de mayo and El tres de mayo rank among Madrid’s most emblematic paintings as they bring to life the 1808 anti-French revolt and subsequent execution of insurgents in Madrid. Alongside, in Rooms 67 and 68, are some of his darkest and most disturbing works, Las pinturas negras with their dark browns and black and distorted animalesque appearance of their characters.

3.     Velázquez

Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velázquez is another of the grand masters of Spanish art who brings so much distinction to the Prado. Of all his works, Las meninas (Room 12) is what most people come to see. Completed in 1656, it is more properly known as La família de Felipe IV (The Family of Felipe IV). The rooms surrounding Las meninas contain more fine works by Velázquez with his paintings of various members of royalty--Felipe II, Felipe IV, Margarita de Austria, El Príncipe Baltasar Carlos and Isabel de Francia on horseback.

Meninas, Velazquez. Prado Museum Guide

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Museum Hopping in Paris, the Art Capital of France

Museum Hopping in Paris, the Art Capital of France

Paris, the city of love, but did you also know it's hailed as the capital city of art in France? This city alone is home to about 200 or so museums. With that being said any art lover would never be able to resist Paris' charm. But with that many museums and not enough time to spend in this lovely city, we give you three absolutely unmissable museums. So what are you waiting for? Get that itinerary ready and don't forget to download the Paris Museums Travel Guide and Offline Map.

1.     The Louvre

Probably the most iconic museum in Paris and for good reason. It's the world's largest museum and considered a city within the city. Not only is it filled to the brim with artistic glories the museum itself is a masterpiece in its own right. It houses over 35,000 works of art and artifacts from the Egyptians, Etruscans, Greeks, and Romans. The main draw of the museum is its painting and sculpture collection. It is in fact, home to the famous Mona Lisa.

Louvre Museum in your pocket

2.      Musée d’Orsay

Imagine a museum set in an old train station dating back the 1900's. Well, imagine no more because Musée d’Orsay’s is exactly just that. This quaint museum houses an enormous collection of works by Delacroix, Monet, Courbet, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec and many others. In 2011, the museum reopened its most important rooms that are dedicated to the artworks of Courbet and Van Gogh. If you ever need a break from walking around stop by its submarine themed cafe tucked behind a clock designed by the Campana brothers.

3.     Musée du Quai Branly

If you've already gotten your fill of European art then head over to the Musée du Quai Branly. This museum is uniquely surrounded by lush greenery and nestled on the banks of the Seine. It's dedicated to the ethnic art of Africa, Oceania, Asia, and the Americas. Artifacts on display include a tenth-century anthropomorphic Dogon statue from Mali, Vietnamese costumes, Gabonese masks, Aztec statues, Peruvian feather tunics, and rare frescoes from Ethiopia.

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The Best Places to See in Toledo, the Walled City of Spain

The Best Places to See in Toledo, the Walled City of Spain

Toledo is a testament to Spain's diverse history where you see churches, synagogues, and mosques stand together in its historic quarter. Sitting atop a gorge overlooking the Río Tajo, it was known as the ‘city of three cultures’ in the Middle Ages, a place where Christian, Muslim, and Jewish communities peacefully coexisted. It is also a city rich in stunning countryside views and is known to be El Greco's inspiration for his paintings, which are on display around the city. Enjoy this wondrous city with the Toledo Travel Guide and Offline Map on hand.

1.      Alcázar Fortress

At the highest point in the city emerges through the imposing Alcázar. The stone fortification was once used as a Roman palace in the third century and was then restored under Charles I and his son Philip II of Spain in the 1540's. Once the court moved to Madrid, Alcázar it eventually became a military academy. It is a place that indeed stands the test of time. In the 1930's the fortress was heavily damaged during the siege of the garrison by loyalist militias at the start of the civil war. Today, it is reopened as a vast military museum.

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2.      Museo de Santa Cruz

Can you imagine a hospital that boasts an ornate plateresque portico that welcomes you into a series of with six cradles that intersect forming four courtyards? Well, Museo de Santa Cruz was exactly just that. The 16th-century building is a work of art that was built to centralize assistance to orphaned and abandoned children in the city. Now it houses beautiful arts and ceramics with various sculpture exhibits on display.

3.      Cathedral

The Toledo Cathedral is one of the most notable cathedrals in Spain. In fact, it ranks among the top 10 cathedrals in the country. The illustrious building is an impressive example of medieval Gothic architecture. Its enormous interior is full of the rose windows, flying buttresses, ribbed vaults, and pointed arches, which are classic pieces of the style. The cathedral is an art gallery by its own right, with displays of old masters such as Velázquez, Goya, and El Greco himself.

Toledo Travel Guide

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You will surely love Philadelphia!

You will surely love Philadelphia!

The Pennsylvanian city is home to over one and a half million people and is the nation's fifth largest city. Philadelphia is considered to be the birthplace of the United States. It was here that the nation's Declaration of Independence from Britain was first read publicly back in 1776.

The tolling of a two-thousand-pound bell marked the occasion. The bell has since become a symbol of freedom and can be admired in the Liberty Bell Center.

Philadelphia's Famous Liberty Bell
Philadelphia's Famous Liberty Bell

Our Philadelphia Travel Guide and Offline City Map Support will surely help travelers to this country!

Well here are some good-to-know things before going around Philly!

Philadelphia is also the birthplace of the Constitution, which was debated eleven years later across the road in the State House, which is now the Independence Hall. America's Founding Fathers walked these Old City streets, and the many heritage buildings in this area are preserved as part of the Independence National Historical Park.

Take an audio tour to hear gripping stories that bring the world-famous jail back to life.

To hear more voices from the city's past, head to the African American Museum. Its audiovisual projections and artifact collection are aimed at preserving the heritage of African Americans.

Within Washington Square lies The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution. The city's colonial past is still apparent, but nowadays Philadelphia is a modern city, with plenty of art, shopping and culture. Do as locals do and explore the city by bike or public transport, or hop on and off a sightseeing bus.

Fairmount Park is the city's public backyard. It's great for a walk and it showcases many architectural treasures. Admire outdoor art on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, or check out the Smith Memorial Arch, dedicated to the military heroes of the Civil War. Strike Rocky's pose on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Set upon a hill, the neoclassical building is one of the largest museums in the country.

Amazing Philadelphia Museum of Art!
Amazing Philadelphia Museum of Art!

It has over 200 themed galleries displaying nearly 230,000 paintings, sculptures and objects.

The Please Touch Museum means play time for the kids. Even toddlers will love this hands-on museum, where they are never hushed.

Who doesn't want to get lost in Wonderland for a while?

The interactive displays in the museum are fun and educational. Children can also learn a great deal in the Academy of Natural Sciences on Logan Square. Admire the displays of the various species that roam the far North and take the opportunity to pet live animals.

To sample the local food, head straight to the old Reading Terminal Market. Find out why the locals love their Cheese steaks so much, or handpick deli treats from the colorful stalls. For more culinary discoveries visit Philadelphia's Italian Market on Ninth Street.

Philadelphia's climate is very pleasant in springtime and fall. Those colorful seasons bring out the best of the city, but it's fair to say that Philadelphia is stunning all year around.

Come to Philly any time you like!

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